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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All,
Recently my OEM reverse/ backup camera went tango. When I took it apart, there was evident corrosion on the camera's circuit board. Toyota's OEM replacement part costs over $300. I've seen a few posts recently that indicate this might be an increasingly common problem, so I thought I'd post how I replaced the OEM cam with a cheap aftermarket camera (Esky® EC170-11 World Smallest HD Color CCD Waterproof Vehicle Car Rear View Backup Camera, 170 Degree Viewing Angle Rearview Camera- Size: 0.86*0.65*0.50 inch (No Guideline Version)). The OEM camera is a CMOS type, but CCD or CMOS types will work as a replacement. I tried both sucessfully, but I didn't care for the guidelines on the CMOS so I went with the no guide CCD one. As reference, I have aftermarket wheels mounted with no hub cover, so your spare mount may involve removing a hub cover. Also, the disclaimer, damage and injury could occur. Do not attempt if you are not familiar with electrical safety procedures.

1. Removing the bad OEM part. The camera is mounted to a bracket held on by two bolts (I used a 12mm socket to remove the bracket). Once the bolts are removed the camera bracket will be loose, and you can gently pull the wiring out of the hub until you can get to the harness connector on the back of the camera. Disconnect the harness. Remove the camera from the bracket and open it up by removing the screws. this is where I spotted some green corrosion on the back side of the circuit board. Remove the tiny 4 wire (Red, Black, White, Yellow) connector from the circuit board. KEEP THE HARNESS PART OF THE BACK PANEL (pictured in Pic 1) WITH THE FOUR WIRES Carefully remove the connector and strip the end of each of the four wires. (Picture 1)

2. Attaching the Aftermarket Connectors. The replacement camera (Cam, from hereout) uses an RCA connector for video and a 12v barrel plug for power and comes with RCA and 12V power extension cords. Cut an end off the RCA extension leaving 4-5" and strip the wire carefully with a sharp knife. Inside that wire, you'll have a yellow wire and loose copper ground strands. (See Pic 2) Next, cut the connector end off the power extension, leaving 4-5" and strip the wire with a sharp knife. Inside that wire, you'll find red and black (See Pic 2). Strip the end of the yellow, red and black wires, exposing about .25" of copper. Connect wires of the harness to the RCA and power extensions as follows (Props to Breagle for sussing out the correct connections!) : Yellow harness wire goes to yellow RCA Extension wire. White Harness wire goes to the loose copper ground strands. Red harness wire goes to red power extension wire. Black Harness wire goes to black power Extension wire. if you're using shrink tubing, don't forget to put them on the wire now. (Pics 2, 3 and 4) I soldered wires, but quick disconnects like the one in pic 3 and crimper will do the job if you're not a solderer. Test the camera by connecting the RCA and power plugs and shifting into reverse in a safe manner. (Be aware of any helpers you might have milling about). Check the connections and wire colors if there isn't a clear picture displayed when you shift into reverse (like in pic 8). Shrink the shrink tubing with a blow dryer once the test is successful.

3. Connecting and remounting the Cam
Slide the connectors through the square opening in the bracket first, you'll need to do them one at a time (Pic 5). connect the RCA and power to the harness. Wind the RCA and barrel plugs with Electrical tape. Reconnect the harness, neaten up the wires with one zip tie to rule them all. (Pic 6) Slide the wires back through the hub and hand tighten the two bracket bolts holding the bracket in place. Your camera mounting method may differ depending on your camera , but I anchored the cam foot by pinching it behind the bracket, between the bracket and the mount, as I tightened it. Once the bracket is tightened, the cam isn't going anywhere. (Pic 7)

4. Enjoy your $20 replacement of a $300 part.(Pic 8)
 

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Very nice write up.
I always wonder if the oem back up cam could be replaced if it ever took a dive with an aftermarket cam. You answered my question. Thanks!
 

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G'day,
Nice set up...
Why didn't you just hardwire the two together ? and save using the connectors ?
did you heat shrink the RCA / Power connectors after joining them ? to keep the water tight ?
Nicely done tho'
cheers
Baz
:blueblob:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey all,
Glad the write up might be useful to folk!

I heat shrank mostly just to keep anything from shorting against another raw solder connection. I'm also a terrible electrical taper!

I thought about directly wiring to the harness rather than use connectors, but I went this way for two reasons: 1) I'm just not sure how long a $20 cam will hang in there and I wanted to make the next switch out easy , if it ever happens. And 2) I had to be careful about cutting too far up on the cam wires. There's usually a bump in the cam cable right around where the cables split. Inside this bump is a tiny inline circuit board that I believe, is a voltage regulator. I actually tried cutting up past that bump in a previous (and epic) fail. Without that chip, and thusly the correct voltage, you'll end up with a jittery picture. So even without the connectors, we're stuck with a lengthy run of wire from the cam. Direct wiring could be done, though, and would probably look cleaner than the mare's nest I tucked away!
Cheers!
 

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What's even better is that is the replacement camera buys the farm all you have to do is unplug the cables and reconnect the newer new one.
 

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Finished replacing the backup camera on my 2013 TTSE today. Racerechhs's instructions worked as advertised. I made a couple discoveries I'd like to share:

1. On my 2013, the grid is not a camera function, it's built-in to the screen in my rear-view. Thus, I swapped out for a no-grid camera and still had the OEM grid.

2. I came up with a way to mount the camera that is more solid than pinching It behind the bracket. Just requires drilling two holes in the bracket and sourcing some stainless steel bolts, lock nuts, and washers. (Pix attached.)

3. BTW: The camera in the OEM camera assembly is just a little board (see photo). I had an idea to try to find a replacement that I could dig the camera out of to just swap out the part in the OEM assembly. I couldn't find one, but?if someone did?that would be the ultimate fix.

Thanks again to racerechhs for the post.
 

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BTW: The dealer wanted $850 to replace the camera. Looking forward to canceling that appointment. Saved $830!
 

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Attempted this today and I think I ended up with a bad camera. Going to order another one from amazon tomorrow, wasn't getting any video to pop up on the review mirror.


Did did google the parts number and apparently its the same as the Toyota Camary. I'm going to dig around the next couple of days and see if I can find a camera with the same board, its gotta exist somewhere!
 

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Just performed this, as instructed. Very easy to do and it works great! Thank you!!

P.S. Be sure to give yourself plenty of length with all of your cables!
 

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My camera works fine for now, but I css in that tiny mirror monitor. I see in one of your pics you routed the feed to your stereo. Was it difficult to find the right video feed wires?
 

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I have a 2011 FJ Trail Teams Edition with the rear view display in the mirror. I replaced the original camera (part 86790-35040 )
in the center of the spare tire mount with Esky EC170-08 Waterproof Night Vision HD CMOS (part 181-00170-08) for $32.00 including shipping. I Followed the wire splicing example provided by racerecchs from the Jul 2010 posting. Drilled a couple of holes on the bracket to mount the new camera. I think the Esky EC170-08 for $32.00 is a better camera than the original 86790-350 for $461.00.
 

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Any body find a replacement mirror with a larger display for the oem camera

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk
 

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I agree that little screen in the rearview is almost useless. I see the OP has his screen in the radio..is that just a newer model than my 2010TT or an aftermarket deal?
 

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just wanted to say thanks to racerecchs for taking the time to write up that DIY i have been searching for days for info on replacing an OEM camera with an aftermarket one. Unfortunetly for me it didnt work i had a different camera so ill probably be ordering the same one to see if i just bought a bad camera. my wire harness on my kia forte has the same colored wires as your harness so im really hoping the camera i bought was D.O.A.
 

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Hi All,
Recently my OEM reverse/ backup camera went tango. When I took it apart, there was evident corrosion on the camera's circuit board. Toyota's OEM replacement part costs over $300. I've seen a few posts recently that indicate this might be an increasingly common problem, so I thought I'd post how I replaced the OEM cam with a cheap aftermarket camera (Esky®️ EC170-11 World Smallest HD Color CCD Waterproof Vehicle Car Rear View Backup Camera, 170 Degree Viewing Angle Rearview Camera- Size: 0.86*0.65*0.50 inch (No Guideline Version)). The OEM camera is a CMOS type, but CCD or CMOS types will work as a replacement. I tried both sucessfully, but I didn't care for the guidelines on the CMOS so I went with the no guide CCD one. As reference, I have aftermarket wheels mounted with no hub cover, so your spare mount may involve removing a hub cover. Also, the disclaimer, damage and injury could occur. Do not attempt if you are not familiar with electrical safety procedures.

1. Removing the bad OEM part. The camera is mounted to a bracket held on by two bolts (I used a 12mm socket to remove the bracket). Once the bolts are removed the camera bracket will be loose, and you can gently pull the wiring out of the hub until you can get to the harness connector on the back of the camera. Disconnect the harness. Remove the camera from the bracket and open it up by removing the screws. this is where I spotted some green corrosion on the back side of the circuit board. Remove the tiny 4 wire (Red, Black, White, Yellow) connector from the circuit board. KEEP THE HARNESS PART OF THE BACK PANEL (pictured in Pic 1) WITH THE FOUR WIRES Carefully remove the connector and strip the end of each of the four wires. (Picture 1)

2. Attaching the Aftermarket Connectors. The replacement camera (Cam, from hereout) uses an RCA connector for video and a 12v barrel plug for power and comes with RCA and 12V power extension cords. Cut an end off the RCA extension leaving 4-5" and strip the wire carefully with a sharp knife. Inside that wire, you'll have a yellow wire and loose copper ground strands. (See Pic 2) Next, cut the connector end off the power extension, leaving 4-5" and strip the wire with a sharp knife. Inside that wire, you'll find red and black (See Pic 2). Strip the end of the yellow, red and black wires, exposing about .25" of copper. Connect wires of the harness to the RCA and power extensions as follows (Props to Breagle for sussing out the correct connections!) : Yellow harness wire goes to yellow RCA Extension wire. White Harness wire goes to the loose copper ground strands. Red harness wire goes to red power extension wire. Black Harness wire goes to black power Extension wire. if you're using shrink tubing, don't forget to put them on the wire now. (Pics 2, 3 and 4) I soldered wires, but quick disconnects like the one in pic 3 and crimper will do the job if you're not a solderer. Test the camera by connecting the RCA and power plugs and shifting into reverse in a safe manner. (Be aware of any helpers you might have milling about). Check the connections and wire colors if there isn't a clear picture displayed when you shift into reverse (like in pic 😎. Shrink the shrink tubing with a blow dryer once the test is successful.

3. Connecting and remounting the Cam
Slide the connectors through the square opening in the bracket first, you'll need to do them one at a time (Pic 5). connect the RCA and power to the harness. Wind the RCA and barrel plugs with Electrical tape. Reconnect the harness, neaten up the wires with one zip tie to rule them all. (Pic 6) Slide the wires back through the hub and hand tighten the two bracket bolts holding the bracket in place. Your camera mounting method may differ depending on your camera , but I anchored the cam foot by pinching it behind the bracket, between the bracket and the mount, as I tightened it. Once the bracket is tightened, the cam isn't going anywhere. (Pic 7)

4. Enjoy your $20 replacement of a $300 part.(Pic 8)
Did you move your rear view camera or is it moveable?

On mine, i see a lot of rear bumper, that your screen doesnt show
 

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this was without a doubt the simplest and most cost saving fix ive ever done on any car for anything electrical/mechanical/aesthetic/etc. in my entire life. i ran into a small hurdle in that my rca cable had 4 wires. i said eff it YOLO and attached the yellow/yellow and the bare ground/white and left those other 2 reds hanging in the wind. plug that thing in and hit reverse and BAM success.

the cam i bought was the esky 170-08 for $19 on amazon
picture below is from the cam just resting on my rear tire, with the blue tape still on the lens. dont judge me for owning an old jeep
Word if caution before you bolt it all up. The cam is upside down for our install. I also had to re drill my holes to be all the way up front on the bracket. And cut a lot of materiel on the front end so i could tilt it down more.

/forums/images/FJCruiser2/smilies/tango_face_angel.png
 

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