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2007 FJ MT
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Looking for a bit of advice: I have a 2007 MT with 219k on it and it looks like it's eating a bit of oil. I have checked for oil leaks underneath and obvious things like blue smoke - nothing. In general everything runs as it should, that being said, I am fairly certain that I filled it with the right amount of oil, so it went somewhere...

So short of full engine rebuild, I was wondering if it would make sense to do one of them oil flushes (probably liquimoli) and may be drop the oil pan to clean.

Thoughts?
 

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You really need to determine where the oil going and the actual rate of oil loss in miles-per-quart before doing anything.

Being "fairly certain" that you filled it with the correct amount of oil is not good enough.

With the vehicle on a dead-level surface and the oil at operating temperature, note exactly where the oil is on the dipstick. Add oil to bring the level up to the top mark, and record the odometer reading.

Drive the vehicle while checking oil level weekly. When the oil level drops to the lower mark, record the odometer reading and the amount of oil required to bring the oil level (hot) back up to the top mark, and calculate the oil loss in miles-per-quart.

If you are consuming oil at a greater rate than about 1 quart every 3k miles you have excessive oil consumption.

Then, have a mechanic perform a cylinder leakdown test to determine if worn piston rings are a factor. If the rings are worn, then you are looking at an engine overhaul, but if the engine has been properly maintained and not abused the rings should not be 'worn out' at only 219K miles.

Other questions:
1. When was the PCV valve last replaced? Excessive crankcase pressure from a restricted PCV valve can cause excessive oil consumption.
2. What viscosity oil are you using? A higher mileage engine should be running at least 10W-30 oil.
3. Have you meticulously inspected the entire engine exterior for any signs of oil leakage?
 

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I'd check what FJtest asked with his questions. Then if addressing any of those questions doesn't work, then I'd just keep an eye on the oil level and add as needed and run it until it's dead then have it overhauled or purchase a ready to go already overhauled engine.
 

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2007 FJ MT
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You really need to determine where the oil going and the actual rate of oil loss in miles-per-quart before doing anything.

Being "fairly certain" that you filled it with the correct amount of oil is not good enough.

With the vehicle on a dead-level surface and the oil at operating temperature, note exactly where the oil is on the dipstick. Add oil to bring the level up to the top mark, and record the odometer reading.

Drive the vehicle while checking oil level weekly. When the oil level drops to the lower mark, record the odometer reading and the amount of oil required to bring the oil level (hot) back up to the top mark, and calculate the oil loss in miles-per-quart.

If you are consuming oil at a greater rate than about 1 quart every 3k miles you have excessive oil consumption.

Then, have a mechanic perform a cylinder leakdown test to determine if worn piston rings are a factor. If the rings are worn, then you are looking at an engine overhaul, but if the engine has been properly maintained and not abused the rings should not be 'worn out' at only 219K miles.

Other questions:
1. When was the PCV valve last replaced? Excessive crankcase pressure from a restricted PCV valve can cause excessive oil consumption.
2. What viscosity oil are you using? A higher mileage engine should be running at least 10W-30 oil.
3. Have you meticulously inspected the entire engine exterior for any signs of oil leakage?

FJtest comes to save the day again. I shall do as you say and will report the results.
In terms of other questions:
1. When was the PCV valve last replaced? Excessive crankcase pressure from a restricted PCV valve can cause excessive oil consumption.
This might have not been done at all - I shall get on it
2. What viscosity oil are you using? A higher mileage engine should be running at least 10W-30 oil.
Using Mobil 1 High Mileage Full Synthetic 5W-30
3. Have you meticulously inspected the entire engine exterior for any signs of oil leakage?
I believe so, I will keep looking.
 

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If you do a "flush", you run the risk of knocking any gelled oil in the heads loose, which could make matters worse. Another quick test is to check for oil ash deposits on spark plugs which is an indicator of internal oil consumption. As FJtest says, if the PCV valve doesn't solve it, the leak down is the only way to figure it out, but as Nameuser said, you can just add til it really becomes a problem, which is what most folks do anyway. Another alternative is to get a low mileage engine from a bone yard (Toyota uses this engine a lot); some will do the swap for you, at a fee, of course.
 

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2007 FJ MT
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok here is me being dumb. I am sorry in advance.

1. Replaced the valve. The old valve looked dirty but seemed to function properly when I blew into it (not sure what the pressure is inside the block, so maybe not a good test)

2. Checking the oil. So car idled for 8 minutes and then I let it sit for 10 minutes. Pull the dipstick, wipe, push in, wait a few seconds, pull again and try to interpret (I didn't whip it around or anything) . Help me here please - am I doing it wrong somehow? Is this half way between full and empty marks? It looks like it's touching the tube and dragging the oil somehow?
Insect Wood Twig Dragonfly Pest
 

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Heres what I know. The FJs dip stick is nortorious for NOT being accurate. On your next oil change fill it with 5.5 qts of oil and then see where it sits on your dip stick and that will be your correct measurement :)
 

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Ok here is me being dumb. I am sorry in advance.

1. Replaced the valve. The old valve looked dirty but seemed to function properly when I blew into it (not sure what the pressure is inside the block, so maybe not a good test)

2. Checking the oil. So car idled for 8 minutes and then I let it sit for 10 minutes. Pull the dipstick, wipe, push in, wait a few seconds, pull again and try to interpret (I didn't whip it around or anything) . Help me here please - am I doing it wrong somehow? Is this half way between full and empty marks? It looks like it's touching the tube and dragging the oil somehow?
View attachment 1179619
Honestly, checking the engine oil level is not rocket science. But, to get valid results you need to do it correctly.

1. First of all, because oil has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, the oil must be at full operating temperature before checking the level. Running the engine for only 8 minutes won't begin to get the oil hot enough for a level check. At least 15 - 20 minutes of running under load (not just idling) are required to get the oil up to temperature, depending on ambient temperature.

2. After engine shutdown you need to wait at least 5 minutes for the oil to drain back into the oil pan before making a level measurement.

3. The vehicle must be on a level surface.

4. Checked per the above, the oil level should be at the TOP mark on the dipstick. The oil should never be allowed to drop below the BOTTOM mark.

Regarding oil usage, the FJC owner's manual says that up to 1.1 quarts per 600 miles is acceptable, although that sounds grossly excessive to me.

Here is Toyota's recommended procedure, from the '13 Owner's Manual:

Font Parallel Motor vehicle Rectangle Car
 

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I would stick to FJTest's procedure on this one. Don't jump the gun and get in a hurry replacing things yet. This doesn't do anything to prove where the oil loss has gone.

This quote: "Regarding oil usage, the FJC owner's manual says that up to 1.1 quarts per 600 miles is acceptable, although that sounds grossly excessive to me."

I believe Toyota's test model lists this as acceptable to an engine with up to 25% compression loss or closer to the end of engine life. With Toyota quality comes the assumption that an owner or multiple owners will have the vehicle for many years to come. Details in an owner's manual are designed to compensate for some wear of components, including the engine throughout the projected lifetime of the vehicle. I've found that a few import brands' nomenclature states the same ideology.
 
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