Toyota FJ Cruiser Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

I have been trying to do some digging on this and haven't quite seen anything that fits the description of what I am having.

I recently bought a 2007 FJ cruiser 4wd automatic transmission that was in a tad rough shape for a good deal and am trying to get her fixed up. I recently did a timing chain change (in which I replaced all 3 chains, tensioners, dampers, waterpump, etc) and, from what I can tell, that went over as well as it could have. However, since the repair I had the p0335 code pop up. Now I've read a lot of forums saying that this usually results in the engine dying, but I have not experienced this. My engine runs fine for the most part ( there is a rare and occasional sputter? effect I'll feel but it quickly goes away and back to normal). Sometimes when I start the FJ up the code won't be present and I can always clear it for a while with a code reader before it will pop back up.

I'm wanting to diagnose and fix the P0335 so that I can focus on the sputter effect next. All in all it's running fine so i'm not even sure if it is a huge issue or not. Any and all help is appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,741 Posts
Please clarify what this means: "I recently did a timing change ...".

Missing word?

Do you mean you replaced the timing chain?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Please clarify what this means: "I recently did a timing change ...".

Missing word?

Do you mean you replaced the timing chain?
Ah yes, that's my mistake. I'll fix it in an edit. I changed all 3 chains, tensioners, dampers, waterpump, etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Hello all,

I have been trying to do some digging on this and haven't quite seen anything that fits the description of what I am having.

I recently bought a 2007 FJ cruiser 4wd automatic transmission that was in a tad rough shape for a good deal and am trying to get her fixed up. I recently did a timing chain change (in which I replaced all 3 chains, tensioners, dampers, waterpump, etc) and, from what I can tell, that went over as well as it could have. However, since the repair I had the p0335 code pop up. Now I've read a lot of forums saying that this usually results in the engine dying, but I have not experienced this. My engine runs fine for the most part ( there is a rare and occasional sputter? effect I'll feel but it quickly goes away and back to normal). Sometimes when I start the FJ up the code won't be present and I can always clear it for a while with a code reader before it will pop back up.

I'm wanting to diagnose and fix the P0335 so that I can focus on the sputter effect next. All in all it's running fine so i'm not even sure if it is a huge issue or not. Any and all help is appreciated!
Something like this I'm encountering. Same code on my 07 FJ 4WD A/T. When this code came out I was testing my FJ out on the hwy, I pressed the accelerator twice going from 60 to 80 mph, roof tent on top, and PUM! Engine code P0335 on the dashboard. I was testing HP+torque gained from some mods: TRD performance air intake, AFE throttle body spacer, AFE 3-in exhuast system, clean MAF and O2 sensors (4), indeed, I gained HP and torque, I could feel it.

Now, after replacing the crankshaft position sensor and I'm planning to change the sensor's connector but you've given a hint, probably the timing chain is stretched because I heavily forced my truck. It has more power that some parts couldn't handle.

When I change the sensor's connector, I'll share my findings.

Best
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Something like this I'm encountering. Same code on my 07 FJ 4WD A/T. When this code came out I was testing my FJ out on the hwy, I pressed the accelerator twice going from 60 to 80 mph, roof tent on top, and PUM! Engine code P0335 on the dashboard. I was testing HP+torque gained from some mods: TRD performance air intake, AFE throttle body spacer, AFE 3-in exhuast system, clean MAF and O2 sensors (4), indeed, I gained HP and torque, I could feel it.

Now, after replacing the crankshaft position sensor and I'm planning to change the sensor's connector but you've given a hint, probably the timing chain is stretched because I heavily forced my truck. It has more power that some parts couldn't handle.

When I change the sensor's connector, I'll share my findings.

Best
Hey, did you see any metal shavings on yours when you replaced it? I did when replacing mine and it turns out that's what was causing the issue. I fixed this just by putting a magnet on the oil filter until I could open the crank case and investigate the shavings...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Hey, did you see any metal shavings on yours when you replaced it? I did when replacing mine and it turns out that's what was causing the issue. I fixed this just by putting a magnet on the oil filter until I could open the crank case and investigate the shavings...
I haven't changed the timing chain yet. But when I changed the crankshaft position sensor, I couldn't tell if there were any burrs there. Adding a magnet sounds simple and effective, I'll do that as well. Good idea. @FJtest what do you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I haven't changed the timing chain yet. But when I changed the crankshaft position sensor, I couldn't tell if there were any burrs there. Adding a magnet sounds simple and effective, I'll do that as well. Good idea. @FJtest what do you think?
Good idea man! Be cautious about it though, it is a bandaid. I had a Toyota mechanic tell me the FJ has a non-interference motor and that was a load of malarky. Now I'm replacing the motor...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Good idea man! Be cautious about it though, it is a bandaid. I had a Toyota mechanic tell me the FJ has a non-interference motor and that was a load of malarky. Now I'm replacing the motor...
Wait, are you saying that adding a magnet in the engine oil pan caused more damage than benefits and now you're replacing your engine?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Not at all! But if the timing chain slips/breaks you'll be in for a world of hurt like me.
Oh! I see. Makes sense now. I'll do an oil change and take a look at it, if there are some burrs it'll be more likely that it's the timing chain, if so, I'll reach out to you again in order to ask your guide to change it.

Thanks.

PS: If you can share how much you're spending on your new engine, it could give me a good idea to start saving money. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Oh! I see. Makes sense now. I'll do an oil change and take a look at it, if there are some burrs it'll be more likely that it's the timing chain, if so, I'll reach out to you again in order to ask your guide to change it.

Thanks.

PS: If you can share how much you're spending on your new engine, it could give me a good idea to start saving money. LOL
Heres the deal with a new engine: there are currently 19 total fj engines being sold in the US. So they start at 3.5k for the engine alone, let alone having the labor added...

It's the good and bad of FJ's: they're very reliable so there aren't many to part out haha. I would def do the chain. It's doable by yourself for roughly 1k in parts including new gaskets and water pump and the like, but with how much it costs if you don't get it right, I'd say it's probably worth paying up to have a trustworthy mechanic do it. Best of luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,741 Posts
Not at all! But if the timing chain slips/breaks you'll be in for a world of hurt like me.
So exactly what happened to YOUR engine?

You tried to replace the chain yourself, did it incorrectly, and ended up bending valves because the timing was incorrect?
Or the chain spontaneously 'broke' while the engine was running?
Or something else happened?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
So exactly what happened to YOUR engine?

You tried to replace the chain yourself, did it incorrectly, and ended up bending valves because the timing was incorrect?
Or the chain spontaneously 'broke' while the engine was running?
Or something else happened?
The latter. Did the chain according to the manual, and it ran fine, code free for a while. Then shavings started appearing (believably from the right chain, tensioner or guid) and about 4 months after it snapped. I was told by a Toyota mechanic that it was non-interferance and to just to replace the chain should it have problems, but he was full of **** and I should have looked into it better than taking his word for it. I just assumed that he knew the motor since he works for the company that makes them but you know what they say about assuming...

Long story short, the right chain either broke or slipped causing the valves to be damaged and now I'm getting a new motor...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,741 Posts
The latter. Did the chain according to the manual, and it ran fine, code free for a while. Then shavings started appearing (believably from the right chain, tensioner or guid) and about 4 months after it snapped. I was told by a Toyota mechanic that it was non-interferance and to just to replace the chain should it have problems, but he was full of **** and I should have looked into it better than taking his word for it. I just assumed that he knew the motor since he works for the company that makes them but you know what they say about assuming...

Long story short, the right chain either broke or slipped causing the valves to be damaged and now I'm getting a new motor...
OK, so you attempted to R&R the chain yourself, did something wrong, and something in the valvetrain came loose or broke shortly after you replaced the chain.

Not clear how whatever the Toyota mechanic may have told you about interference vs no-interference had any bearing on the engine failure ... would you have done something different during the chain replacement process if you had known it was an interference engine?

Almost all engines with chain-driven camshafts are interference by design since the crank sprocket/cam sprocket timing is 'fixed' and only a catastrophic mechanical failure in the cam drive system can cause bent valves. Interference design allows greater valve lift and a wider range of valve timing options, which yields more torque and HP, better fuel economy, wider power band, etc.

Conservatively-designed timing-belt engines will be non-interference because the probability of failure with a rubber timing belt is much, much greater than the probability of chain failure. However, some timing belt engines ARE interference, and you better adhere to the timing belt replacement schedule or risk disaster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
OK, so you attempted to R&R the chain yourself, did something wrong, and something in the valvetrain came loose or broke shortly after you replaced the chain.

Not clear how whatever the Toyota mechanic may have told you about interference vs no-interference had any bearing on the engine failure ... would you have done something different during the chain replacement process if you had known it was an interference engine?

Almost all engines with chain-driven camshafts are interference by design since the crank sprocket/cam sprocket timing is 'fixed' and only a catastrophic mechanical failure in the cam drive system can cause bent valves. Interference design allows greater valve lift and a wider range of valve timing options, which yields more torque and HP, better fuel economy, wider power band, etc.

Conservatively-designed timing-belt engines will be non-interference because the probability of failure with a rubber timing belt is much, much greater than the probability of chain failure. However, some timing belt engines ARE interference, and you better adhere to the timing belt replacement schedule or risk disaster.
It would have made a difference yes. Probably wouldn’t have attempted it myself if I had know the correct information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,741 Posts
Yeah, that makes sense ... consequences of some minor assembly error can be $$$$.

In your search for a replacement engine, remember that Tacomas still used the single VVTi engines after 4Runner and FJ had switched to dual VVTi engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Yeah, that makes sense ... consequences of some minor assembly error can be $$$$.

In your search for a replacement engine, remember that Tacomas still used the single VVTi engines after 4Runner and FJ had switched to dual VVTi engines.
Does this mean that a Tacoma VVTi engine (which year?) will fit into an FJ with no extra adjustments? I'm just wondering
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Does this mean that a Tacoma VVTi engine (which year?) will fit into an FJ with no extra adjustments? I'm just wondering
I was told by a different mechanic that I actually trust that you want an FJ motor, but I’m curious as well. It’s definitely be cheaper if you could grab one of those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,741 Posts
From your friends at Wikipedia:

1GR-FE applications.PNG


Because of Toyota's effort to constantly implement subtle improvements, it's probably 'safest' to try to locate an engine of the same model year as your vehicle.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top