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Discussion Starter #1
So Ive noticed a couple light scratches on my FJ and a little chip at the edge of the drivers door.

Is there really a product that you can just put in to take care of it?

I think im just obsessed right now with the FJ 🤣

Thank you!
 

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I'll second that Automotive Touchup! I've used it on quite a few cars; both rattle can and the little bitty applicator method.

if the chips go down to the metal, get the primer also.
 

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Thank you for the website. I too have a couple rock chips to touch up in army green. Great to have the color match. Just ordered all the supplies to do it correctly. Thanks again.
 

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They claim it needs to be clear coated


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I've been to that website and have seen that too.

What method are you all using when it comes to touching up rock chips? I'm a little hesitant to use any kind of "sanding" or "wet sanding" when it comes to my paint.

I'm thinking I can get by with one of their touch-up pens, but then do I have to clear coat it too?
 

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Depending on how much time you want to spend, and how "perfect" you want it to turn out there is a few different options. The one I like, and have used does involve some light wet sanding. But works great. Use a needle, tip of knife blade, or the sanding tip of the touch up pen to lightly clean any debris out of the chip. If you have bare metal, you should use a bit of self etching primer, not a have to if it is a tiny chip, but anything bigger than say a pencil eraser, you will want to. Use a fine tip tooth pick. Gently dab in the primer not to get it too thick. You don't want it to be taller than the chip. If it is a bit, you can use that same sanding tip on the touch up paint pen to level it back down after it drys. But you want it below the surface of the paint. Get that cleaned up, then use the tooth pick again to dab a bit of paint into the chip. Same rule applies, you don't want it mounded up past the surface of the paint. If it is single stage paint, it can be a bit mounded up, but you will need to level it back out with wet sanding. If you are using base coat/clear coat, you want it lower than the surface of the paint. After that drys, again, use a tooth pick to just lightly dab a bit of clear coat that has been reduced properly, (Most is 4 to 1) Try to fill the rest of the chip with the clear. Don't get too carried away and mound it up to deep but slightly past the surface of the paint is fine. After that sets and drys, I would give it 24 hours or so, get some 2000 grit paper, and lightly level it making sure you don't cut too far into the clear coat surrounding the chip. If you burn through, you are screwed. The trick to this step is take your time, and use water to keep the surface wet. Lightly sanding (LIGHTLY). Once you get your clear leveled with the paint surface. Time to break out the buffer. 3 steps. Compound, machine polish, then micro finish. Sonax makes a great 3 stage polish that I love. Another step if you dare before you wet sand is the razor blade method. Hold the blade securely. Sharp side toward the paint, blade 90 degrees off of the surface. Strait up and down. Gently scrape the blade across the mounded clear coat. This will slowly plane down the clear mound until it is almost flat with the paint. Be very careful with this step. Don't scratch the rest of the paint. Then you can do the wetsand with 2000 grit I described above.

If all this is too time consuming, get the ole touch up pen, and dab away. If it says it requires clear, you will want to use some. Otherwise, your paint will not seal up properly. Take your time with either. It's not all that hard once you get past the fear of it all.
 
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