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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I haven't seen a parking brake shoe replacement tutorial for the FJ so here goes.


Pray to the automotive gods above that you don't have to do this because it's a royal pain in the butt! >:D


Parts List: I bought everything at Autozone for ease of convenience:
Duralast Brake shoes Part #850 $34.99
Duralast Brake hardware kit part #17395 $19.99
Brake cleaner


Tool list:


17mm socket to remove the rear brake calipers
Long needle nose pliers
Flathead screwdriver
Bar clamp
Short prybar
Hammer
short 1/2" socket extension
Extra set of hands to help reinstalling the retainer cups (very helpful but not needed)


Before we start tearing everything apart here's a diagram of the rear brake assembly courtesy of perpetualjon from Toyotanation.com.



He goes into complete detail on a Sequoia here: Rear Parking/Emergency Brake Shoe Replacement Instructions - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums


We obviously need to block the front tires, jack up the car, remove the wheels, and release the emergency brake lever.


The rear brake calipers are held on by a pair of 17mm bolts, takes those off and slide off the brake caliper. Rotate the axle so that the access hole is at the 6 o'clock position and you can see the star wheel. Release the tension on the star wheel so that you can slide the rotor off the hub.


Again image courtesy of perpetualjon



Once I took off the rotor I was presented with a badly worn brake shoe due to a broken retaining spring.



Use a flat head screw driver and/or pliers to remove the upper most shoe retention spring. Rotate the axle again so that the access hole is inline with the brake shoe retainer cup.



Use a pair of thin long needle nose pliers and depress the spring cup down to relieve the spring tension, then rotate the cup 90 degrees so you can release the spring cup.



Once the brake shoe is free remove the emergency brake line and you should have a brake shoe that looks like this with the emergency brake lever attached.



As you can see here my brake shoe was badly worn and cracked from dragging on the rotor all of the time.



Pry off the horse shoe shaped retainer from the old brake shoe and remove the emergency brake lever.



When I took off my old shoe....bits and pieces of the old retainer spring fell out and here is what it looks like compared to a new spring. LOL



The stud that is pressed into the old brake shoe needs to be reused so I used a hammer and a 1/2" extension to bang out the stud. Once removed you should be left with a short stud looking like this:



Grab your new bag of brake hardware and arrange the parts so that it's clearly visible as to where they go.



Hammer the stud back into the new shoe and reinstall the emergency brake level along with the new shim and horse shoe retainer.



Before reassembly be sure to spray down the brake assembly to remove any brake dust residue. Reattach the emergency brake cable on to the lever and install the upper most retainer spring. Remove the old spring retainer pin and install the new one along with the retainer cup with a leg attached. At this point I found it easiest to install the spring and top cup together as one unit behind the axle. Once all of the parts are aligned use the bar clamp to pull back the brake shoe so that you have enough room on the retainer pin to install the retainer cup and use the pry bar to keep tension on the retainer pin as you rotate the retainer cup with your needle nose pliers.


This is the MOST difficult part of the installation and once you get one brake shoe done, the other's will be much easier to do since you've over come the learning curve. The final juggling act looks like this:



Repeat the same steps for the other brake shoe and take note of how the shoe strut and spring are installed....because it can only go one way. Once the other shoe is installed just insert the star wheel into the slot and reinstall the anchor spring and you're DONE! Repeat the process on the other side and be sure to torque your caliper bolts and lug nuts to spec.


One a side note: there was very little wear on my OEM brake shoes even though I had 160,000 miles on them. The only reason I needed to swap them out was due to the broken retainer spring. With my driving style I would assume that I would have gotten 300,000 EASILY on the OEM brake shoes.

Good luck and I hope this tutorial has been helpful!


-B
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the kind words! The parts are relatively cheap so I decided to swap it all out so I won't have to do it again for another 8-10 years. lol

-B

I have a squeak on my left rear, and I am at the end of my travel on my hand brake at 140,000kms... I bet one of my springs is busted too...

Great write-up!

@bazross - Can we have this added to the technical articles section please? Who is taking care of that section now?
 

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Has anyone attempted this with Nitro Rear Chromoly Axle Shafts? I have these and there is no access hole. I successfully adjusted my parking brake today, but had to remove the rotor in order to access the star wheel. After my first attempt the shoes stuck on the test drive, despite the fact that the wheels turned freely when reassembled on jack stands. Not the first time the shoes have been stuck, so I suspect the springs are not doing their job and would like to replace them.
On a side note, the previous time the shoes got stuck I had the dealer fix it. Today I was surprised to find the brake that they fixed was smothered in grease. Grease all over the shoes and in the drum. I'm pretty sure that's not a good thing.
 

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Im trying to pm u but apparently your inbox is full im looking for the leather one! Never knew that non leather existed

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
 

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Thanks for this write up, it does not look fun. I drove next to a building today and heard a squeal from passenger rear. It got worse the longer I drove it. Took it home and started tearing down the brakes then the rotor. Once the rotor was eased off with two bolts all sorts of worn out parts started to spill out onto the floor. Retaining spring was in three pieces. Clearly I broke a spring or spring retainer. Off to autozone I go. I was hoping someone was going to say slide out the axle for easier access :)
 

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Many thanks for the write-up - awesome work!!!

Got my bits from Advanced Auto - paid around $50 for the shoes - a bit more than I liked - but they came with the studs.

Quite some fiddly work, took me all day. A large printout of the diagram was really helpful to me, worth mentioning: The setup on the FJ doesn't have an anchor spring (or at least mine didn't), otherwise the diagram is spot-on.

Maybe a small time saver: When I took my rotors off I saw that the hooked cups weren't slotted into the holes. After much mucking around I just took the nose needle pliers to the hooked cups and pulled them towards me and inwards, which allowed the spring cups just to slide off the slotted part of the brake shoes.

Again, many thanks - this helped a lot!
 

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Nice write up, thanks for sharing!
Had no idea there were grease points for the pads, I typically only apply at the star adjuster.

Has anyone attempted this with Nitro Rear Chromoly Axle Shafts? I have these and there is no access hole. I successfully adjusted my parking brake today, but had to remove the rotor in order to access the star wheel. After my first attempt the shoes stuck on the test drive, despite the fact that the wheels turned freely when reassembled on jack stands. Not the first time the shoes have been stuck, so I suspect the springs are not doing their job and would like to replace them.
On a side note, the previous time the shoes got stuck I had the dealer fix it. Today I was surprised to find the brake that they fixed was smothered in grease. Grease all over the shoes and in the drum. I'm pretty sure that's not a good thing.
Ran into the same issue with the Currie 35 spline shafts, I drilled them for access to the e brake star.
 

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Ran into the same issue with the Currie 35 spline shafts, I drilled them for access to the e brake star.
I'm still having issues with the shoes sticking and then chewing up the springs and clips. I think drilling the hole to access the star wheel is certainly the best option. Might need to get a professional to do it though - I went through 6 brand new bits and barely got an 1/8".
 

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One a side note: there was very little wear on my OEM brake shoes even though I had 160,000 miles on them. The only reason I needed to swap them out was due to the broken retainer spring. With my driving style I would assume that I would have gotten 300,000 EASILY on the OEM brake shoes.

Good luck and I hope this tutorial has been helpful!


-B

@Blown383 thank you for this guide! Would it be possible for you to update the first post with working picture links? Photobucket has blocked the images :rawr:
 

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x2 photo bucket rendering this thread almost useless now

The parking brake access is so difficult due to the rear axle flange in the way, it is so frustrating building that ship in a bottle, especially when you get to the simple step of rotating the star wheel in and out to adjust the shoes.

I wonder if it would be faster/easier to pull the half shafts out of the rear axle first! (only kind of kidding when I say that)

N
 

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I think drilling the hole to access the star wheel is certainly the best option. Might need to get a professional to do it though - I went through 6 brand new bits and barely got an 1/8".
Wow that's crazy. Are you using new bits? Did you drill a pilot hole or did you attempt to go final size in one pass? I can see how that would be problematic. I banged out both of mine in short work but I drilled a series of holes and used cutting/cooling oil.
 

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Wow that's crazy. Are you using new bits? Did you drill a pilot hole or did you attempt to go final size in one pass? I can see how that would be problematic. I banged out both of mine in short work but I drilled a series of holes and used cutting/cooling oil.
Didn't use cutting oil. And was using cobalt bits not carbide bits. And my drill only has one speed. I'm sure if I use carbide bits, cutting oil and drill slow it will be fine :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Do you have any reccomendations for a photo hosing site? Screw Photobucket and their strong arm money grabbing tactics!!!!! LOL

-B

@Blown383 thank you for this guide! Would it be possible for you to update the first post with working picture links? Photobucket has blocked the images :rawr:
 

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I just switched to Flikr - seems to work fine once you figure out how to get the upload URL.
 

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Do you have any reccomendations for a photo hosing site? Screw Photobucket and their strong arm money grabbing tactics!!!!! LOL

-B
Like mentioned above, Flickr works well. I personally use Imgur for a lot of photo hosting :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Guys just add the "Photobucket fix" app on Chrome and clear your cache to see the images.

-B
 

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Thanks for that excellent write up and all the suggestions. I've spent most of the day trying to replace one of the retainer springs. I gave up and will try again tomorrow. FYI: Don't try and put your automatic transmission from park to neutral after you have everything off. To do so requires you to apply the brake which then blows the caliper cylinder out. I can't believe I did that.
 
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