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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
The lack of a fan also means there is no need to bypass the DRL resistor. Lower current to the fan is one of the main reasons that LED headlights with fans fail when used as DRLs, isn't it?
True. That being said, I'm thinking about bypassing my DRL resistors (actually, removing them and replacing with a length of wire). No real need, but the LED headlights are exactly the same brightness in DRL mode, so what's the point of having them?
 

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True. That being said, I'm thinking about bypassing my DRL resistors (actually, removing them and replacing with a length of wire). No real need, but the LED headlights are exactly the same brightness in DRL mode, so what's the point of having them?
My thinking was I would forget to turn them on in the dark since they are just as bright as when turned on anyway, and I'd be running around no tail lights until it was dark enough to notice the dash lights not being on.
 

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LEDs in a reflector will:

1) cause glare
2) not really be any brighter than stock
3) reduce distance of the headlights
4) increase foreground lighting

Because of this, a retrofit is still the best there is for FJ headlights. Pricing is as cheap as $135 too...
My experience with the Philips LED set is very different.

1) A bit more glare, yes.
2) Notably brighter than stock.
3) The stock beam pattern is mostly retained, and with light output being brighter, I'm not seeing a decrease in 'throw' at all.
4) I actually have slightly less foreground lighting compared to stock. But more lighting out at distance and to the sides.

My gripes so far:

1) A bit more glare than stock. Using brighter bulbs in the same housings = more glare. No way to get around it. I still haven't gotten high beamed by anyone but I know my headlights aren't as pleasant for oncoming traffic as the stock bulbs were.
2) Not enough heat is retained in the housing, which means snow/ice builds up and you will need to make stops to brush the snow/ice off of the lens during longer drives. I also don't see a real way around this.

But with those gripes in mind, I've had no issues so far with the Philips LED set and the pros outweigh the cons for me. Are they worth the price? If they end up lasting the 50,000 hours as expected, then yes. Absolutely.
 

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I want to chime in here as I just bought what I assume to be the 60 dollar chinese knock offs of these phillips-chipped bulbs from ebay. I have already disabled my DRL circuit by removing the inline resistor for the stock halogen configurations. However, it would appear that there is some kind of "box" that is going to be in line with my new LED bulbs from china. Is this the DRL box? Do we even know? I'm wondering if there is anyway to not use it or just bypass it but it seems like its all molded inline with the main plugs. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

Specific Ebay Link: 2X H4 LED Headlight Lamps Hi Lo New Philips Chips Xenon White High Power 100W | eBay

Mystery Box in question:

 

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Discussion Starter #25
... However, it would appear that there is some kind of "box" that is going to be in line with my new LED bulbs from china. Is this the DRL box?
Probably just the driver box. The LEDs require, at a minimum, some sort of current limiting (there may also be voltage regulation in the driver box). Without it, the forward voltage would cause excess power dissipation and burn up the LED almost instantly.

Here's the math...

A typical H4 bulb has a resistance of about 0.2 ohms when cold. But that rapidly climbs to about 3.5 ohms when they are turned on and the filament heats up.

12V / 3.5 ohms = 3.4 amps

12V ^ 2 / 3.5 ohms = 41 watts

You can't directly apply Ohm's law to an LED besause it's voltage/current relationship is not linear, but for all practical purposes, an LED behaves like it has a resistance near zero. So if you model that as, say, 0.01 ohms, you get:

12V / 0.01 ohms = 1200 amps

12V ^ 2 / 0.01 ohms = 14,400 watts

Pop! Your LED is gone.

Here is the driver box for the Philips LEDs. This is separate from the DRL circuit.

 

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Discussion Starter #26
Update:

I have been running these bulbs for 3 years 3 months now. Someone PM'd me to ask how they were doing, and some installation questions, so I am sharing with everyone.

How are your H4 Philips X-treme Ultinon LED Bulbs doing?
I had one bulb get significantly dimmer at about the 2-1/2 year mark. XenonDepot replaced it under warranty, no questions asked. Other than that, no problems. Still as bright as ever, and when aimed according to the Toyota specs, I do not get flashed when in lo beam.

Would you recommend bypassing the DRL upgrade and going just with the upgraded bulbs?
You don't need the DRL Upgrade option - on the FJ it makes no difference. I would recommend bypassing the DRL resistors though. These are located behind the removable panel that runs beneath the headlights. You just replace the resistor with a wire, or run a wire in parallel. This gives the LEDs full voltage in DRL mode. It is debatable if running them at reduced voltage really affects them, since there is no fan, but they appear to be the same brightness in DRL mode anyway, so adding the wire does not change the appearance.

Any hints and tips for installation or just were rubber gloves so you don't damage the bulbs, install and go?
As far as installation, you need to find a spot to mount the driver boxes. I just used self-drilling screws into the bodywork in the engine compartment near the lights. As far as handling them with gloves, that is more of a concern with halogen bulbs which get VERY hot and can be damaged by oil from your fingers. Obviously it causes no harm to use gloves if you like.

One final point... If you live in a snowy area, the LEDs do not warm the outside of the headlight the way regular bulbs do. So snow does not melt and clear as well.
 
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