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Great post. Nice to have all this recovery education in one place. Regarding snatch straps (kinetic recovery straps) - one of the videos recommends a strap rated for 2.5 - 3 times the weight of your vehicle. Underated straps risk breaking, but over-rated straps won't stretch sufficiently.

The curb weight of a 4WD Automatic FJ is 4,295 lbs, which calls for a snatch strap rated for 10,737.5 to 12,885 lbs. However, I can't find a snatch strap rated that low, and ARB says, "The 17,500 lb model is recommended for most 4WD vehicles, with the 24,000 lb & 33,000 lb straps better suited to heavier applications."

Am I making mountains of molehills or is this discrepancy a legit concern?
 

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You are making mountains.

You have to remember that with a snatch strap(kinetic recovery strap) there is a second vehicle moving which adds to the load.

I have Bubba Rope -3/4" x 20' rated for 19,000lbs. It works just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #64
Great post. Nice to have all this recovery education in one place. Regarding snatch straps (kinetic recovery straps) - one of the videos recommends a strap rated for 2.5 - 3 times the weight of your vehicle. Underated straps risk breaking, but over-rated straps won't stretch sufficiently.

The curb weight of a 4WD Automatic FJ is 4,295 lbs, which calls for a snatch strap rated for 10,737.5 to 12,885 lbs. However, I can't find a snatch strap rated that low, and ARB says, "The 17,500 lb model is recommended for most 4WD vehicles, with the 24,000 lb & 33,000 lb straps better suited to heavier applications."

Am I making mountains of molehills or is this discrepancy a legit concern?
I am of the frame of mind that the ARB 17,500 strap is more closely rated for the FJ. It is a bit overrated for an OEM FJ but certainly not as much as some of the Bubba ropes and alternatives. That said, most of our FJ's are pushing 5000lb or more by the time we add aftermarket bumpers, winches, lifts, tires, refrigerators, tents, and other off road / Overland accessories. Everyone has to factor that in to their own individual setup.

The bigger concern, and more to the point, is to try and match your gear as close 'as you can' to your application. I would much rather break a strap than bend or break a hard part on the truck and turn said hard part into a missile. Take that into consideration before attaching a 30,000lb rated strap to a 4.75T rated shackle attached to a 5000lb rated tow hitch.
 

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Thanks guys. Awesome thread
 

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Got to be honest, I have tried this, and it works.
Granted, I did it twice and it was ugly both times, but in the end it finally worked.

It cracks me up that no matter where you are, what country, what culture, and what language you speak there are certain universal truths:

1) Everyone gets stuck

2)There are always 15 guys standing around barking at you.

3)Every man in every culture and in any language really feels the need to tell you how to do everything, or tell you how you are doing it is wrong.


This might be a good video to add to the original collection. Pretty ingenious.

How to get out of a bog - YouTube
 

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I drive mostly on sand and the hi-lift with the offroad base and lift-mate along with a shovel and maxtrax are invaluable for self recovery using the jack & pack method:

1:) lift the wheel using the hi-lift & lift-mate
2:) fill the hole under the wheel so it's slightly proud of the surrounding sand.
3:) put the maxtrax/floor mats/anything under the wheel
4:) lower the wheel down
5:) deflate down to 10 lbs
5:) repeat for each wheel!
6:) lock all diffs, low range, ATRC on
7:) Success!

This can take time, and and can be hot work in the desert (rest regularly, in the shade & get fluids if you need to) but if you don't take any short-cuts, in my experience you should get free 95% of the time on the first attempt.
don't forget to (walk!) back & recover your maxtrax!

Maybe also consider how to deal with a tyre pop-off (again - you really need a hi-lift, lift-mate and compressor for this) - this can easily be done alone with the wheel on the car.
demonstrates a safe technique.

Awesome thread - thanks for starting it!
 

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Got to be honest, I have tried this, and it works.
Granted, I did it twice and it was ugly both times, but in the end it finally worked.

It cracks me up that no matter where you are, what country, what culture, and what language you speak there are certain universal truths:

1) Everyone gets stuck

2)There are always 15 guys standing around barking at you.

3)Every man in every culture and in any language really feels the need to tell you how to do everything, or tell you how you are doing it is wrong.
Awesome! - burying the spare tyre would also work if you don't have a sandbag handy.
 

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Maybe also consider how to deal with a tyre pop-off (again - you really need a hi-lift, lift-mate and compressor for this) - this can easily be done alone with the wheel on the car. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEtdtapiXGA demonstrates a safe technique.

The guy is a bit goofy, but that is a heck of a lot safer than the fire technique I have seen used before. Thanks!
 

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The guy is a bit goofy, but that is a heck of a lot safer than the fire technique I have seen used before. Thanks!
Yeah - there's a lot of rednecks using engine start on youtube. Personally I have never needed the ratchet strap - I just put the compressor on and pull the tyre toward me from each side while bracing against the rim with my foot while it's up on the hi-lift. quick & easy.
 

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Assuming "light duty" recovery, e.g. snow drift, muddy creek crossing, what would folks recommend as the minimum winch capacity? I'm leaning towards a Warn 8000, but want to make sure I shouldn't have gotten a 10K.... Thanks!
 

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Hey guys I am rechecking this thread and suggest that it's a thread that everybody should revisit just from a safety standpoint. When I first visited this thread I was a nooby and approached as such with the attitude "I don't have a winch but the guy that does will know what to do", this IS NOT always the case. I have seen people using a winch that I wouldn't trust with a block and tackle. Also from a pure safety stand point the information is valuable. Hi lift jacks, snatch straps and "D" ring shackles are all a part of offroading and should be treated with much respect and the more knowledge you have the more likely all the rigs and all the humans will return from a day on the trails in tact.
 

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Assuming "light duty" recovery, e.g. snow drift, muddy creek crossing, what would folks recommend as the minimum winch capacity? I'm leaning towards a Warn 8000, but want to make sure I shouldn't have gotten a 10K.... Thanks!
I went with a superwinch tigershark 9500, or close to 10k.
I've used it to recover other folks, not myself yet.
I think, and I'm sure smarter folks will/should chime in, that going with the 10K is better for recovering your rig and others.
 

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Assuming "light duty" recovery, e.g. snow drift, muddy creek crossing, what would folks recommend as the minimum winch capacity? I'm leaning towards a Warn 8000, but want to make sure I shouldn't have gotten a 10K.... Thanks!
While I think the 8k is good enough to get you out of 95% of situations considering I often hardly have to pull with my Warn 9.5 to get myself up an obstacle. I have during extreme use nearly stalled my winch (with the motor running to supply more power) on one or two very strong pulls. One of them the other FJ was at a very steep incline with a front tire needing to get pulled up about a 3 ft bump and the rear bumper was pulled over a stump. I was at the top of the hill pulling up. Most of the time I'm surprised with what little effort it takes. Also dual batteries helps quite a bit to supply more power on the harder pulls. I only have one big battery. If I had to replace my 10 year old 9.5 Warn, it would be with a bigger one. BUT like I said for most situations its not usually needed.
 
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