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So, this is my first set of Radial tires that I have used for wheeling. Always ran bias. I am running 33/12.5 R 17 Irock ND's on a 17x9 aluminum MotoMetal wheel. No bead locks. Wheel size required by tire manufacturer is 9-10. For trails, some rocks, dirt and mud in Florida (Not Moab) how low can I safely run my tires without taking a big risk of coming off the bead. Bias I would go down to 15 or so lbs, and always did fine. But that has a thicker sidewall. So was not sure how the Radials would fair. Input appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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My standard psi when wheeling is usually 18 psi.

If I end up in really soft stuff (snow or sand) I go down to 15 or so... But almost all the time I'm around 18..... ish.

I've got 33's crammed on my 16" TRD rims.

:cheers:

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For my E rated Yokohama Geolandar G003 MT its 37 on road and 20 off road, the soft compound grips perfectly with these numbers dialed in.
 

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For my E rated Yokohama Geolandar G003 MT its 37 on road and 20 off road, the soft compound grips perfectly with these numbers dialed in.
Just because I have seen it before, and have researched it but don't trust what I understand all the time... The "E" rating... Is that max load, max PSI of the tire, or indicating 10 ply rather than less? Been seeing it mentioned, just want to be sure. Education is the key..
 

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Just because I have seen it before, and have researched it but don't trust what I understand all the time... The "E" rating... Is that max load, max PSI of the tire, or indicating 10 ply rather than less? Been seeing it mentioned, just want to be sure. Education is the key..


Load rating on radial truck tires indicated the load they are built to carry. Load ratings for light truck tires go from B-F. With the load increasing as you go through the alphabet. The ply rating used by some manufacturers was to help users familiar with bias ply tires equate radial construction methods with earlier style strength from direct ply count. So for example my tires are a load range E. Which carries a 10 ply rating. Most modern load range E tires don’t have 10 plies due to modern materials and construction methods yielding higher strength with less weight.


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Load rating on radial truck tires indicated the load they are built to carry. Load ratings for light truck tires go from B-F. With the load increasing as you go through the alphabet. The ply rating used by some manufacturers was to help users familiar with bias ply tires equate radial construction methods with earlier style strength from direct ply count. So for example my tires are a load range E. Which carries a 10 ply rating. Most modern load range E tires don’t have 10 plies due to modern materials and construction methods yielding higher strength with less weight.


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So, just to further the beating of the dead horse... My Iroks have a weight rating of 3195. All I can find on the charts are PSI rating. So what would that make this tire clssification?
 

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Not sure,

The ratings and indexes were come up with for tire catalogs to allow tires to be indexed shorthand.



On this receipt, you can see the shorthand for my ko2s.

“LT225/75r16 115S E1” that tell the salesman all he needs to know about my ko2 vs another tire when fitting it to a vehicle.

Outside comparison to similar tires it’s not terribly useful in the real world.


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Just because I have seen it before, and have researched it but don't trust what I understand all the time... The "E" rating... Is that max load, max PSI of the tire, or indicating 10 ply rather than less? Been seeing it mentioned, just want to be sure. Education is the key..
Ply rating has nothing to do with physical number of lies but the strength. All E rated tires today have three plies at max but achieve their load rating via many factors including design, thickness and other tech. The max PSI is for max load rating, something our vehicles will never achieve. The PSI rating has to be achieved with trial and error and chalk test and overall feel of the ride. For instance the compound in Geolandar MT003 are far pliant compared to the Cooper STT Pro I had on my other vehicles so for off road I don't need to air the tires down much. On road my experiments yielded 37-39 as best compromise for even wear, ride and handling but for other brands it will differ.
 
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