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Discussion Starter #1
So I am still working through repairing my 2007 Toyota FJ from having an issue from boosting it as it froze here in Manitoba with the winter. So far have cased fuses for the alternator and the abs and ects. The radio is still not working currently and need to fix that. It is an aftermarket head unit. Looking to check all the fuses first. I know that there 2 in the under hood fuse panel that have check out. Are there any more?
 

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Someone may have left fuse in the original wire harness for the radio buried back behind the radio itself. That is almost step number 3 here for you. Do you have power at the radio. If not follow the most likely constant hot and the switched hot back until you have a wow moment.


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Discussion Starter #6
Just diagnosed down the line to find that all the factor fuses were still intact and then pulled the dash center plate off and found a connector with a built in fuse.
 

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.Let me try again. Where does that hot originate? If it starts at the fuse block, I hope you cut that fuse behind the radio out or increased its size so as not to be a bother again. I think that would be the commonsense thing to do. Protect the radio with something you can get to.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It is the connector integrating the factory harness into the aftermarket radio so no i am not going to remove the fuse.
 

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I think you're missing Sparky's point.

The radio, and the wiring carrying B+ to the radio, should be protected by a fuse at or very near the origin of the B+ supply. One option is to install an 'Add-a-circuit' adapter to one of the multiple unused positions in the cabin fuse panel near your left knee. That way, you can select at appropriate fuse rating to protect the radio from any kind of internal short circuit, as well as protect the B+ wiring to the radio.

The fuse in the radio connector will NOT prevent a short in the wiring to the radio from burning up the wiring unless there is another fuse 'upstream' of the radio connector.

If there IS another fuse upstream of the radio connector, then the fuse in the connector is redundant, and should either be eliminated, or replaced by a higher amperage fuse so it is never the first to blow in case of any failure. It's much more logical to replace a fuse in the fuse panel than to tear the dashboard apart, isn't it?

Additionally, what caused the radio fuse to blow in the first place?
 
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