Toyota FJ Cruiser Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I love the FJ. I've had Jeeps and an old Land Rover ('62)--all great vehicles but was excited about getting a new FJ. I have done extensive FJ research and all seemed great until I came across the incredible number of rust and rot issues discussed, especially involving the frame.

In the fall I looked at several 2011s and 2010s on dealership lots. Although looking to buy new, I like to look at used to see how they age. I noticed an unusually large amount of rust on the undercarriages, in the engine compartments and on hardware, etc. At first I thought maybe flood damage (I am in Northeast), or beach/off-roading related . . . but now not so sure--especially given the great number of articles and posts both here and across the net. This concern was further reinforced when looking under *new* FJs and seeing rust on welds and other frame components. Granted I take very good care of all of my vehicles, but I have not seen this degree of rust on cars this new--maybe this was common in cars built in the 80s but certainly not so now.

Given all the Tacoma frame rust issues and the recalls and buybacks, it would seem like Toyota would have addressed this rust and dependability issue--have they? At $35,000+ these are not "cheap", disposable vehicles and owners should be able to expect longevity from quality frames and components. While we can undercoat and paint--without pulling the frame and immersing, there is no way to adequately coat inside box frame. (I remember the manager at one dealership telling me with pride how Toyota had "taken care" of the Tacoma frame problems--I remember thinking, why did they occur over such a long period to begin with). Also read somewhere that FJs are not made at Toyota plant in Japan, but rather at a separate "commercial vehicle plant" for Toyota and this might affect quality (can't remember name off hand).

Has Toyota recently improved frame rust issues? Thoughts? Thanks!





.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,507 Posts
Mine is 4 years old, and does have rust on the welds as you mentioned. It has since day one. It hasn't gotten any worse though. :cheers:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,412 Posts
Toyota traded the rust issue for Radiation after the Great sunomi.. JOKE.. My eight year old jeep has NO rust because I take care of it and a few of my 4x4 friends eight year old jeeps are completely rusted out so I think its more user lack of owner maintenance than manufacturer error.. Toyota is a great company who screwed up with Flat speakers..lol
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,793 Posts
I haven't ever seen a thread which shows more than surface rust in general to my recollection. You'll have that in any type of salt environment.

Mine has had the same surface rust it had in PA 4 years ago. Nothing more than that
x2

Is rust even an issue for the average, non-northern, FJ?

No vehicle does well up north with the amount of salt there, so i don't even consider those in the equation.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,160 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Your concerns about rust are legitimate. I have also seen pics of FJ frames that are more rust than metal.

The welds are rusty on my FJ frame (bought new Oct 2011) but the rust does not appear to be getting worse or spreading.

Rusty Toyota's are a sore subject for me because I took great care of my 99 Tacoma and still lost it to frame rust. The rust on the frame was literally the only rust on the vehicle.

Toyota bought the Tacoma back and I used the buyback check to get me into the FJ, though I would have rather stayed in my Tacoma because I had never had to make a payment on it.

The jury is still out as to how well the FJ frame holds up given the salty roads here. I am hedging my bets by washing the FJ weekly and using a wash that includes an under body blast as part of the wash cycle. This seems to be working, so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,503 Posts
I believe that if it is well taken care of then rust will not be a problem. I purchased my FJ used this summer and the frame had a lot of surface rust. I spent a couple weekends sanding and repainting it with Por-15 and I am confident that it will hold up well to Michigan winters. I would strongly recommend washing the undercarriage during the winter and treating it with a product like fluid-film or Boe-shield in the fall and possibly even the spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
The only rust issue I've seen with them on road salt exposure was one with 170k that needed a manifold replacement(Catalyst below effieiciency)bolt heads were completely rusted round/smooth, but no frame/body issues here. That one had spent it's life in the mountains of NC while attending Appalachian State University, and communting home to the beach at Wilmington NC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9 Posts
I coated the underside with Por-15 about a year after I bought my fj. When I coated her, the underside looked like the factory coating was holding up quite well but I would rather not take the chance. It only takes a few hours if you have a lift.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,793 Posts
I coated the underside with Por-15 about a year after I bought my fj. When I coated her, the underside looked like the factory coating was holding up quite well but I would rather not take the chance. It only takes a few hours if you have a lift.
POR-15 work fantastically. It actually adheres better to rust than bare metal.

Though, it is kind of a pain in the butt with the amount of prep work needed, with the metal-ready, and cleaner, then applying.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,735 Posts
Do you have to apply before rust starts? I have a bit on the welds and my front dif is covered.
Nope. Just spray it on and it penetrates and turns into a hard wax. It does need reapplication every couple of years.Cool thing is that it is a motorcycle chain lube as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
So dirt wont stick to this stuff ? So far mine is good, but I spend a great deal of time on logging roads and am looking for some additional protection. Thought about just using rubberized undercoat but not sure that would slow the rust process any if its being applied over existing rust.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,735 Posts
If you spray over rust with an overcoat like line-x or bedliner, you will not stop the rust. If anything you may complicate things. Negate the rust either chemically or physically before going this route. Since new, I have been using Amsoil MP HD and rust is at a minimum. The wax finish should repel mud or at least make it easier to rinse off. Get as much loose debris off the underside before applying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I work for a dealer and we see it all the time. The rot that occurred in the Tundra's and Tacoms's was pretty bad on some vehicles and others were absolutely fine. Toyota does not manufacture or treat the frames that were going bad so they made a change in the company that makes the frames for them. We did see our first Sequoia that had severe frame rot and are in the process if seeing if Toyota is going to cover that one.

From my personal experience, gulf states, east coast and cold weather climate vehicles are always far worse than other regions. Even cars from the great lakes regions have severe corrosion, even when brand new. The salt water air just wreaks havoc on the metal surfaces. Cars that are in the saltwater climates are much worse than say the Midwest where we get plenty of snow and subsequently sand, salt and brine solution coating our city streets.

On another note, some surface corrosion is almost always normal. I have never seen a frame or differential fail from surface rust. I see it on every vehicle that pulls through the shop and it is almost never a concern. Some bolts will get rusty and hard to remove but other than exhaust, we just don't see it as a huge problem.

I for one, just clean the underside on a fairly regular basis.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,735 Posts
This thread gave me a great idea! My past life as a sailor reminded me of a way we used to mitigate corrosion on ships and equipment exposed to salt spray. Zinc! We used to have sacrificial zinc blocks we used to bolt to structures. The zinc corrodes instead of the metal surface it is attached to. There are several threaded holes on the frame and suspension that chunks of zinc can be attached to. Be sure it has a good electrical connection to the part you are trying to protect.

Chemistry - Rust prevention by sacrificial anodes

Cathodic protection - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
Re: Re: Rust--Still An FJ Issue?

This thread gave me a great idea! My past life as a sailor reminded me of a way we used to mitigate corrosion on ships and equipment exposed to salt spray. Zinc! We used to have sacrificial zinc blocks we used to bolt to structures. The zinc corrodes instead of the metal surface it is attached to. There are several threaded holes on the frame and suspension that chunks of zinc can be attached to. Be sure it has a good electrical connection to the part you are trying to protect.

Chemistry - Rust prevention by sacrificial anodes

Cathodic protection - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Great post. It worked on my outboard motors.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top