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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
1137185



Of these, the Forum has multiple - but is there a particular Thread you would recommend which stands out as a DIY instruction set?

One with links to Pictures / Videos?


Trying to avoid this situation :)
 
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What do you consider diy? The more effort you put in with prep work and quality paint the better your rust prevention is going to be. What kind of tools do you have access to? How much $ are you willing to spend? How much time are you willing to spend?
 
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I did a bunch of reading and concluded that the best course of action is:

• Remove as much loose rust and flaky paint as you can by hand with wire brush or with a power tool and wire wheel (a drill works well)

• Clean with soap and allow to dry

• Paint with some kind of rust converter (I used Rustoleum Rust Reformer in a rattle can)

• Paint with good outdoor/automotive paint (I went with rustoleum in a rattle can again)

• Treat with something to keep the moisture and salt off (lots of options, Fluid Film is popular but hella messy; I will use something else next time)

• Get under there and evaluate once or twice per year and repeat as necessary

I’m not going to take credit for this; it’s what others with more knowledge and experience recommended I’m just summarizing

Dan
 

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only 2 things to add to the above list:

1) before applying the first layer of paint, after removing as much rust as possible, wash the surface with a phosphate wash (like Ospho, available at Sherwin Williams), it converts whatever rust is left into iron phosphate to help neutralize the iron oxide, and to make a better bond for the paint

2) body cavity wax, like 3M's cavity wax, which dries to a flexible surface kind of like cosmoline, is a more durable product than Fluid Film, goes on thicker, and dries to the touch, but because it doesn't creep after drying is wise to go over the top of with FF (or any of the FF equivalents, like Boeshield, etc., all based on lanolin, very light weight, creeps well into small crevices, but also washes off so needs annual touchup).


Norm
 

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only 2 things to add to the above list:

1) before applying the first layer of paint, after removing as much rust as possible, wash the surface with a phosphate wash (like Ospho, available at Sherwin Williams), it converts whatever rust is left into iron phosphate to help neutralize the iron oxide, and to make a better bond for the paint

2) body cavity wax, like 3M's cavity wax, which dries to a flexible surface kind of like cosmoline, is a more durable product than Fluid Film, goes on thicker, and dries to the touch, but because it doesn't creep after drying is wise to go over the top of with FF (or any of the FF equivalents, like Boeshield, etc., all based on lanolin, very light weight, creeps well into small crevices, but also washes off so needs annual touchup).


Norm
Do they sell that body cavity wax in a scented version? Asking for a friend. Lol!
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
My vehicle has negligible rust at the moment - it's almost pristine despite being a decade old.

But I'm moving to the Rust Belt soon.

I was thinking of adopting the following routine:

1. Clean with Mineral Spirits
2. Soft Wire Brush with a Power Tool as needed
3. Phosphoric Acid Treatment as needed
4. I was debating whether or not I should use frequent sprays (twice a month?) of really cheap cooking oil or two treatments of CRC 06026, one before and another mid - winter.

However - I have no personal, practical experience as far as "rustproofing" is concerned.

Apart from a general dose inside (hose + 360 degree nozzles) and outside the frame, I have read about the door jambs and side rocker panels, but don't quite know how to approach these areas as far as the FJ Cruiser was concerned. Or if there are other areas which need specific attention, in your experience.
 

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"are there any other areas which need specific attention?"

besides all of the frame rail and the suspension parts (the black e-coat coating on them from the factory doesn't bond to the stitch welds, or to the metal's sharp edges, nor is it UV Stable, so it tends to degrade in hot, sunny areas), also spray some cavity wax (or at least FF) into the bottoms of the 5 doors, and the leading edge of the hood, and up inside of the rocker panels (temporarily remove the rubber plugs to get the 360degree spray wand into all of its inner cavity) as well as getting the bumper structures well coated (the rear bumper inner structure will rust almost as fast as the frame welds do). After dosing everything, poke one of those little red straws (like borrow from a brake cleaner can) up into all of the drain holes to make sure they are all open (the drains are little joggles in the weld flange at the bottoms of the doors and the rocker panels).

after you clean those black, chassis and bumper parts, apply some good quality underbody topcoat paint to them next, because paint is always the best protection against rust.

Then, protect the paint with FF or wax.

Rather than trying to use something incredibly light weight, like cooking oil, or CRC, which will rinse off quickly, use the heaviest stuff you can find, like bulk applied FF, or cavity wax, it will last far longer and coat better. Also, using a food grade like cooking oil will attract rodents who will ruin your electrical system and insulation.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
...also spray some cavity wax (or at least FF) into the bottoms of the 5 doors, and the leading edge of the hood, and up inside of the rocker panels (temporarily remove the rubber plugs to get the 360 degree spray wand into all of its inner cavity) as well as getting the bumper structures well coated (the rear bumper inner structure will rust almost as fast as the frame welds do). After dosing everything, poke one of those little red straws (like borrow from a brake cleaner can) up into all of the drain holes to make sure they are all open (the drains are little joggles in the weld flange at the bottoms of the doors and the rocker panels).
Thanks for the information.

Any chance you could point me towards a video or some photos?
 

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no videos, since everything described is so basic: rust is red, scrape/sand/wire brush it off, clean surface with de-greaser, or oven cleaner if wax/oil/undercoating was applied before, wipe over the de-rusted, bare metal with Ospho, paint over all surfaces with the best quality black underbody paint, then go over that with wax and FF

Here is a link to the 3M Cavity Wax and 360 degree wands: https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company...licator-Wand-Kit/?N=5002385+3293083892&rt=rud

Here is a link to Fluid film: FLUID FILM | Powerful Corrosion Protection & Lubrication

Here is a link to Ospho: Ospho Rust Treatment - Since 1947

Total elapsed time to fully treat the underbody is a couple of weeks, to do it right, being thorough and allowing each step to completely dry before moving to the next step. Take your time, do it once, very well, and not have to keep re-doing it. But make sure to check its condition each year to be sure.

Here is a "before" photo of my Northeast FJ with 80k miles on it (8 years old):
1135544


... and after:
1135545
 

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Hate to throw a wrench into this but I am going to anyway. There is a local business here (I have no affiliation with) who is using dry ice blasting (vapor blasting with dry ice media) to clean, prep, remove rust etc. Sublime Surfacing check their website IG for pics. Had a chance to check out his work firsthand and it was incredible. Might be someone in your area that can do or is doing something similar.
 
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Discussion Starter #13

@norm356

What underbody paint do you recommend?

Also, for a first - time application, how many aerosol cans of 3M Cavity Wax and Fluid Film would I need for a complete application? Not investing in an air pump just yet.
 

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for underbody paint, there are so many good brands, key, if unsure, is to buy from an auto paint store, rather than the hardware store

Por-15 is one brand
Eastwood sells good paints, so I've heard

The best underbody paints will have some phosphates in them, and will be an oxygen barrier (primer, for instance is NOT a barrier, its purpose is only to create a good bond for the top coat).

Underbody paints are best applied by brush, because it goes on thicker, and because brush mix has far more solids than a rattle can/aerosol mix (solids are what does the coating, and for underbody, thicker is better).


for first time application of wax or FF, plan on 3 or 4 rattle cans of each, invest in the long 360degree wands, and pull out rubber plugs to run those all the way in cavities as far as you can go, and apply 3 full coats for complete coverage

Be prepared for drips (put cardboard down, or do this outside)

You will get way more FF applied if spraying it in bulk, using a really cheap gun like this:

but, you will need to borrow a compressor to use it

Keep the wax off of plastics, rubbers and hoses, because its propellant could attack them. And off the brakes, of course.
FF is fine on everything except for the brakes.


Regarding dry ice media, that is an exciting idea. Normally, any blasting media is too risky to get inside of anything, to risk using except on completely torn down components (so you can clean them before re-assembly). But using dry ice would avoid that concern, it would simply evaporate if it got inside of, say, a rear axle housing. Interesting. I'd want to be sure there wasn't anything else in the spray, anything that couldn't evaporate, but aside from that, if it takes off rust it would be an awesome thing!

N
 

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Discussion Starter #18
What's your take on the Skid Plates?

Are they salt shields, or rather traps?
 

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Skid plates: there is so much air flow space designed around them, to avoid them causing any cooling issues, I don't think they would make any difference, either way, corrosion-wise.
 
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