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Discussion Starter #21
Has anyone used NH OIL? If so how is it?
My 09 has a very bad rust problem on the frame, actually, everywhere except the body.
Sorry, no idea.

New to the rustproofing game myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)


Some part numbers listed towards the end, involving plugs.
 

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What's your take on the Skid Plates?

Are they salt shields, or rather traps?
I took them off for a few winters thinking they were salt traps. But I noticed the front frame member gets more bombarded so I was doing more touchups in the Spring. Plus the threads are exposed without the skid bolts. So my opinion is they are more shields than traps. They must come off every spring for inspection/touchups regardless. Moisture will always get trapped to a degree.
 
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That's a good vid but I would paint after the conversion. More protection against air and moisture. It's hard enough to keep the inner frame protected. So the outer surfaces should be sealed as much as possible.

The gas tank skid should also come off and the straps hit with convertor and paint. You'll only get one side and they'll rot from the side you can't access. But it will slow it down.
 
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Has anyone used NH OIL? If so how is it?
My 09 has a very bad rust problem on the frame, actually, everywhere except the body.
Yes ..... I use it on my FJ. I bought an 07 with 88K miles in southern PA. The bottom was reasonably in food shape. I had the entire bottom wire brushed then took or to a shop where they applied the NH system. I’ve received a lot of complements on the underside of the truck. I have it touched up twice a year - once in early spring after the road salt has ended and once just prior to snow fall. The first one is free the second treatment which I choose to do costs me $50. All in all, I am pleased with their system.
 

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Discussion Starter #26

Odd approach, this guy - he used WD-40.
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
The 5 Best Rust Prevention Sprays

Some options.


More options, a better selection at that.





Just some more reviews.
 

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Unfortunately, that "Best Reviews" video concludes that WD-40, which is not a good lubricant because of its residue (and must never be used around critical things like bearings and electric motors), and by their own admission is not the best rust protector, they recommend it as primarily a lubricant and so it is their "best pick"? Interesting. Also, they didn't evaluate a whole ton of other rust preventative products, nor did they discuss any of the other pros/cons that the products they did review, mention on their own websites. I call shenanigans on that website!
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)

Help me out here.

I looked for areas I could insinuate some extended 360 degree nozzles into.


The FJ Cruiser's doors don't appear to have pre - drilled access points.


1137686





I liked these videos for where they showed to go poking around.

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I see the drain holes here - looks like I'll need to flush out some decade - old debris. Since they're readily - accessible, I'll probably use frequent sprays of light oil.

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Going through my older pictures... What are the chances that I'd end up soaking the speaker?

1136716


I have not looked at the rocker panels from the underside just yet - but wonder if that black plug is an access point for trickling oil from above.

Does anybody have pictures of the rocker panels from below?

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I do not see any drain ports for the suicide doors; where are they?

1136719


The rear door, similar to the front doors, has three drain ports (where the dirt is).

The other areas I'll have to look into are the front and rear bumpers. I've taken off the rear fascia (?) to install the trailer hitch before, but haven't worked on the front bumper.
 

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Howdy,
Accessible from outside, for the doors and the rockers, there are little joggled offsets in one of the two mating panels which creates the drain, just large enough for one of those little brake cleaner red straws to fit through

But the very best way to coat inside of the doors is to remove the inner panels and make sure what is coated and that no nooks get missed. For the rockers, you'll find that either on their top surface, after you remove the scuff plates, or on the inner surface after you peel back the carpet, there are some stickers covering holes that were used during weld and paint. You can get the 360 degree long wands in that way.

Do not drill holes to rustproof, those holes edges are where every "rustproofed" car I've ever owned started rusting!

Norm
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Thanks, Norm.

I’ll need to look further...
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)

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Interesting link!
It is too bad the results of their second study, which was expected to be completed in 2017, is not included.

The results of their first study do make sense: only the Rust Oleum product included a top coat. All of the others were converters but with no top coat to protect the result, so I wouldn't expect them to last as long.

Rust protection is a series of layers, and each layer depends on the next to do its job:
- convert the surface to prepare it for coating (this includes removing any loose rust, treating any remaining, microscopic rust to something neutral, which is what the converters in their study are designed to do), this is important even with new steel, but is vital when working with repair of old steel.
- prime the surface so that a top coat paint will bond strongly (primers provide the bond to the substrate, but they are not oxygen barriers, nor are they UV stable, so they depend on a top coat to survive)
- apply a top coat (for oxygen barrier and UV protection)
- apply wax or other similar kind of protection over the paint (to protect the paint)
- apply a thinner, lighter protectant over that (to seep into micro cracks in any portion of what came before, and to act as a sacrificial coating that can be easily replaced as often as is necessary)

None of them, alone, can do their job well, but together can really keep the iron away from oxygen, the enemy.

Some products combine several of these into one, for convenience, like Rust-Oleum Rust Converter, which does work pretty well (converter, primer and top coat), but like most things that do multiple tasks, probably have some trade-offs too.


N
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #35

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Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
1137208


The hood. Lots of holes. Follow where the dirt is, that’s where the moisture tends to track.

1137206


Front doors. There are three drain holes, the picture is missing the one to the right.

Accessible from outside, for the doors and the rockers, there are little joggled offsets in one of the two mating panels which creates the drain, just large enough for one of those little brake cleaner red straws to fit through
1137186


This is the only “drain hole” I could find on the suicide doors. Am I looking in the wrong place?

For the rockers, you'll find that either on their top surface, after you remove the scuff plates, or on the inner surface after you peel back the carpet, there are some stickers covering holes that were used during weld and paint. You can get the 360 degree long wands in that way.
1137184


The holes are under these panels?

1137207


Rear door. Three drain holes.
 

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typically there is only 1 drain hole on a small panel like the access doors
the front doors probably have 2 (one at, or near each corner)
the rockers probably have 3

But, if removing the trim to apply the protection (the best way to do it) then the only thing to do with those drains is to make darn sure they are still open after completing the protection stage (a plugged hole will lead to more corrosion than any lack of coating ever could). I do that with a little red straw.

Regarding the rockers, I've got to admit that I haven't looked for the holes on an FJ yet. But on other Toyotas I've worked on, there were stickers, or grommets, on some surface somewhere on the rockers, usually under the trim or carpet, but could also be on the outside somewhere, to let the e-coat in (and back out again) during the dunk the body shell gets before topcoat paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
The next area of interest would be the Engine Bay; where would be the "vital areas?" I imagine the points where the engine is secured to the frame would be.

From what I've read online (unless what I read was erroneous), Boeshield T-9 can actually be sprayed over the engine itself... Pretty pricey, that product.
 

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The good thing is Boeshield and FF are the same thing: sheep lanolin

As long as you don't get it on the belts, or the brakes, you can pretty much get it on anything, its good for your skin, rubber and plastic, won't hurt paint, and goes on thin enough to not likely clog a drain hole. It will creep into any tiny cracks and help seal it. The only downside is that being light weight it does tend to rinse / wash off.
 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)

The many forms of Fluid Film o_O...



...and how it’s better served warm.

I’m curious if there’s a (volatile, odorless) solvent that would allow me to use Fluid Film in a hand - pumped spray instead of nuking a dozen aerosol cans. Odorless Mineral Spirits, perhaps? I could probably get away with applying it this way (where I currently live, anyway).

EDIT: That’ll damage the bushings and other rubber / plastic components...

Ease of application, and the less intense smell, are currently steering me towards Boeshield T-9.
 
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