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Discussion Starter #41

1137333


1137334


“Vegetable Oil.” Like cooking oil?!
 

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don't thin it, you want it to go on heavy (just like why brush on paint protects better than sprayed on paint)

get a cheap undercoating gun like this:

very easy to use, with any air compressor
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I understand...

But my constraints are within that of an apartment complex where noise / odors / smells / jacked up vehicles are an issue.

I'll probably end up using a mix of rattlecans and a paintbrush.
 

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Has anyone used NH OIL? If so how is it?
My 09 has a very bad rust problem on the frame, actually, everywhere except the body.
I use it on all my vehicles. Unfortunately I sold my FJ last year and picked up a Wrangler (long story) but I had the Wrangler, my Silverado and my wife's Outback all done with NH Oil Undercoating. I'm really happy with it. It doesn't harden like other wax based or rubber based undercoating products. It does actually seep into the metal the way they advertise and continues to creep into crevices after application. They sprayed the inside of the doors on the Wrangler and even after almost a year the oil will still creep out a little bit. The downside is you're supposed to reapply it yearly so there is that added cost. For the little that it costs I think it's worth it. I live in NH and they use a lot of salt up here so I like the idea of something to protect the metal.
 
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"constraints are within that of an apartment complex where noise / odors / smells / jacked up vehicles are an issue."

understood

2 thoughts:
1) the commando approach - rent/borrow a small compressor and do the spray (it only takes about 20 min to do the whole underside), and be done before anyone is able to jump up out of their couch and get all sanctimonious about the apartment rules

2) the rattle can approach - low key, I get it, but it will cost more in materials. What I learned from the 3M tutorial on their website (using a clear soda bottle to make the point visible) for the cavity wax they sell: apply 3 heavy coats from an aerosol spray, to get the equivalent of 1 pass from an undercoating gun.

The other difference between the compressed air spray gun and an aerosol can is how far it will project and how widely it will disperse. Definitely get the long 360 degree dispersing wands to use with a rattle can, so you can fully treat inside the frame rails and rockers (and inside of the hollow suspension arms and reinforcements).

You can do inside of each of the doors all at once (big strip down), or one door at a time (more stealthy). Don't forget the rockers and the back door, and places like the mud traps in the rear fender wells, and pockets like the jack storage area, the engine mounts, frame rails and so on.

One "appeal" of a product that has to be applied annually, like Fluid Film, Boeshield, or NH Oil, is that you will keep finding new places you'd not treated last time, to add to your "complete treatment list" each year (I do).


Norm
 

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Discussion Starter #46
1137460


You said...
 

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Discussion Starter #48 (Edited)

Yikes.


Cancer yikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #49

Should’ve watched this video earlier...

Really shows how to take care of the doors o_O
 

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Discussion Starter #50 (Edited)





Cosmoline!
 

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Howdy,
I’m relatively new and this will be the first major undertaking on my FJ. Here is what I plan on doing. Let me know if any major red flags jump out, otherwise I will extensively document the process and report back with immediate results. Long term results will have to wait.
Preface: FJ has moderate rust and I live in a major Ohio city.

1. Pneumatic air hammer with rubber band to knock off all flaky rust from frame. Thoroughly.
2.Angle Grinder with wire wheel on the frame, again.
3. Air Compressor all loose dust and rust away.
4. Eastwood the interior of the frame.
5. POR15 cleaner/degreaser.
6. POR15 Metal Prep
7. 2 coats of POR-15 on frame only
8. Thorough dry with fans, etc.
9. Top off the POR-15 frame coat with RP-342 for extra protection and shield from rock dings, etc.

Questions: should I RP-342 other parts of the underside other than the frame? Do I need a topcoat between the POR15 and RP-342 for UV protection even if it’s underneath the car?
Let me know if you have any questions and I will do my best to answer as I’m doing this job.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Not sure myself... Haven't decided on what to use just yet.

Cosmoline does look appealing, but it's expensive.

And it'll mess up everything it touches long - term, unless applied meticulously.

From what people describe... I imagine it being as horrible as "Asphalt Juice."
 

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Hate to throw a wrench into this but I am going to anyway. There is a local business here (I have no affiliation with) who is using dry ice blasting (vapor blasting with dry ice media) to clean, prep, remove rust etc. Sublime Surfacing check their website IG for pics. Had a chance to check out his work firsthand and it was incredible. Might be someone in your area that can do or is doing something similar.
What is the name of business? Do you know they have a location in Calgary?
 

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Sublime Surfacing is the name of the business not sure if they have a location in Calgary,

Check for vapor honing or dry ice blasting.

Quick check and Calgary Vapor Blasting and Ultra sonic Cleaning comes up on FB. There may be others.
 
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Just as a ‘for interest’ I’ve spent some time helping out guys who restore old military vehicles from WW2 and later... latest project is a Cromwell tank and currently they are working on getting the T55 used in the 007 film Goldeneye Clean enough to send over to a collector in the US... most of the work is by hand, rust is rubbed back to metal (if there is still some left). Red oxide paint is applied and then primer and top coat. They do not use wax on anything. But they do use the trick of ‘painting’ nuts that may need to be loosened with an oil and grease mixture, enough oil so it paints on, enough grease that it stays on!

1138212
8681EEE6-A410-48CF-B860-40143B11CAEA.jpeg
 

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Zero, you work on some pretty cool stuff: training bomb sniffing dogs, restoring historic military vehicles, weaving soft shackles!

I wonder why they don't use any wax to prevent corrosion?
Perhaps that level of corrosion protection (its like cosmoline) isn't called for because their vehicles rarely see winter road salt, and so just getting them well painted is quite enough?

I've wondered how they get all of the mud off of them after an active display / event. It's heck getting it off of an FJ, I can't imagine what it's like getting a Tiger Tank clean! Something like Fluid Film, or WD40 (actually being used for what it is good for!) on a dirt bike provides a pretty good layer to help caked on mud come off under pressure wash.

Working at that scale, they probably mix their own batches of stuff like that, from raw materials, instead of buying anything like "WD40" retail. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #59
1AC75FF8-B0D4-4153-AC65-FE8C278BBA68.jpeg


Just came across this little area needing attention.

Any other nooks and crannies?
 

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"Any other nooks and crannies?"

yes, all of the way around each of the wheel arches, front and rear, there are a bunch (result of a show car quickly put into production by modifying an existing structure to fit)
 
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