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That looks like a nice, comprehensive set.... Is there much(any?) extra room in the box for extras?
Tons of room! I added a screw driver set, a plier set, a hammer, a rubber mallet, a small hacksaw, some pry bars, allen wrenches a strap wrench and probably some other stuff I'm forgetting. It's a little tight but I can still close the lid.:cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #22
So I asked a question that ocurred to me, and all of the above advice fell in my lap.

I love this forum.
 

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Tons of room! I added a screw driver set, a plier set, a hammer, a rubber mallet, a small hacksaw, some pry bars, allen wrenches a strap wrench and probably some other stuff I'm forgetting. It's a little tight but I can still close the lid.:cheers:

Very nice, thank you!
 

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I noticed that Lowes has a similar set (Kobalt) that's even more modular. I like the setup for the same reason you just gave. Convenient!
i currently use the Lowes (kobalt) set myself and have found it seems to work great! I have just the basic set but added a breaker bar and a torque wrench and I feel I can tackle (almost) anything on the FJ. Keep in mind I'm not using it for pneumatic purposes.
 

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+1 for Metrinch when space and weight are at a premium. Each socket/side of the wrench can fit one metric and one SAE size.

Metrinch-tools - IF THIS CAN'T DO IT, NO TOOL CAN

If you are truly looking for lifetime tools, I would have to say Snap-On or similar. You can find deals on used high-end tools on eBay and Craigslist fairly frequently. Personally I would not think twice about purchasing lightly- to moderately-used Snap On tools unless they were abused or left out in the rain, and even then they hold up pretty damn well.
 

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Personally, better quality tools are worth the money to me but like Dagored I used to make a living with them and still do all my own mechanic work. I'd rather buy a quality piece one time, but I agree that if you're only going to use them occasionally then Craftsman etc. is just fine. You can get good deals on Snap-on tools on ebay.
 

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Kokopelli Moderator
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Chris,
If you can wait, shop Sears for the Craftsman deals on the day after Thanksgiving--known as Black Friday in the retail arena. You will find some KILLER deals on the whole shebang packages on that day!
Bob
 

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I was at a local flea market here, talking with a guy selling snap on and matco, he had a 1/4" drive set probably 13 pieces in the case, his line was "I sell this all day long for $550.00, I'll take $250.00 here"! this was a snap on set, I don't mind paying for quality but that is ridiculous! What would have been 49 or 59 from sears to 250 for snap on?
 

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I have a lot of Snap On, Matco, etc. tools, but unless you work at a place where the truck comes around all the time, and you have a relationship with the guy (and even then) its not worth it to drop that kind of money on tools.

When I had a different career, the Snap On guy was great, he would sharpen gasket scrapers, meet me the night before or early in the morning to change/pick up tools. It could just be that he was a Canadian, who knows, but he was great at his job.

Now, I have a new career and it is a PITA to get Snap On guy to call you back let alone exchange tools.

If you need a specialty tool or a tool that one of the companies do well, go to one of the ' professional tool companies'. For the most part just get your tools from Sears Craftsman in the USA or Sears Craftsman or Canadian Tire in Canada. The exchange of tools is much easier, I think the will let you exchange 'because you didn't want to clean your tools', and the stores are everywhere. I have done every kind of modification to Craftsman tools (eg. grinding sockets and wrenches to be shallower, thinner, thin walled, heated and bent screwdrivers and wrenches, used screwdrivers as chisels and pry bars and used non impact sockets on impact wrenches ( sometimes with reducers from 3/4" to 1/4") and still exchanged them at Sears or Canadian Tire.

Just my .02 cents.

Tom
 
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