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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

While in the midst of uninstalling my oem skid plate to prepare for installing my new skid plate, I had a bolt break…

I’ve done some searching on the web but figured I’d also pic your all’s brains on dealing with this.

the bolt clearly has corrosion around it.

Thanks
1166948

1166948
 

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2011 FJ Cruiser Iceberg
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You should be able to drill that out and get a different bolt from local hardware store. I would hit the broken bolt with some PB Blaster prior to drilling it out. Start with a small drill bit and work your way up. If you are lucky you can drill it out with one size bit smaller than the threads.
 

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x2

using reverse drill bits helps, as if it catches on the broken stub while drilling it'll spin it out (easy win)

However, reverse drill bits tend to only be available in a few diameters, so if you get to the last diameter that'll fit into the threads on the frame but it still isn't out, switch to numbered normal direction bits and gradually increase the diameter of the bits until you just kiss the threads. If you do it right, and use liberal amounts of cutting oil, the stub remains can be turned out with a dentil pick.

To get a center punch to start the first hole right in the center, take a flat grinding disc to grind down the stub end till it is flat.


If you go too far and ruin the original threads, you can install a Heli-Coil (or any of the various competitors) to restore the original size thread. Available at good hardware stores.


Some people will advocate using an "easy out". In my experience, they never seem to work, and being hardened steel can snap off in the hole quite easily, and if it does you are really sunk because you will not be able to drill it out (situation gets far worse at that point).


Norm
 

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2013 Trail Teams <>< <>< <*((^(((><
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You may be able to tap on it to try and loosen it, weld a rod to it and try and spin it back out. Sounds like the other folks have better options.

<>< <>< <>< <*((^(((><
 

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(damn that link is long) i keep a set of L.H. bits just for that. PB blast or WD40 a couple times and let it sit a few hours between. usually drilling heats the bolt up a bit too. most of the time it catches half way through and spins the bolt out. i always use never seize when replacing the bolt. never had to drill one out twice.

(the link was showing "down for maintenance but it does work)
 

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I’ve had good experiences with easy-outs but only when using high quality ones (Cheap ones tend to snap.). If you go the easy-out route, let the screw soak after hitting it with some PB Blaster. Then, after drilling the hole the easy-out will nestle into, hit the metal in the immediate surrounding area of the screw with a torch (propane is fine). It doesn’t need to be glowing red but the more heat you transfer through it the better.
 

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Reel-M-in's suggestion of welding something onto it is the best one, and guaranteed to work.

If you are handy with a MIG/TIG welder should only take a few minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all!

Bad news. I broke 2 left hand drill bits and one easy out (screw extractor) into the broken bolt.

I guess I’m mega screwed haha. Gonna take this one to a shop, as I fear the amount of torque that will be required to break the corrosion around the bolt is going to be far above any method I can deploy.

I should have just drilled it out and re tapped it. I literally had it drilled through and not far from being ready to retap and of course, I had to try the easy out just oooone more time haha
 
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