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Not sure where else to post this on here as this is my first time posting here. but here she goes.
I bought a 2007 FJ cruiser in october, financed it over 3 years with plans to pay it off early it only had 145k km on it i havent even put 5000 kms on the vehicle. everything looked and seemed fine. This week where i live we got some extreme cold temperatures -30 to -48. Leaving work tuesday the check engine light came on along with traction control off and tcs i believe are the lights. driving to work wednesday my oil pressure light came on as i was getting to work. i parked it in the shop thinking maybe the cold weather caused it. the oil looked a little low so i added 1L of oil to it. read it with a code reader P0012 P0022 for both camshafts being over retarded i googled them and it seemed like it could be to low oil pressure as the VVT uses oil to actuate.so we take it to the local dealer and they say it looks like someone sprinkled glitter in my oil and that i need a new engine. so im just looking for advice here on if its worth replacing the engine. kind of lost for words nervous to tell my SO.
 

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Personally, I’d replace throw a set of bearings at it before I replaced the engine. Cross fingers and run it a thousand miles, do an oil analysis and make my call from there.

Dealer service departments aren’t where I’d ever take advice on repairs, but that’s just me...


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2nd opinion.....always, might need a 3rd as a tie breaker.

Tell the SO
 

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#1. Flowers to SO

Do you have any mechanics in the area that you know and trust?

#2. Chocolates to SO
 

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Well, the symptoms are not encouraging. If it were me, I'd ask around and locate the very best engine mechanic (not the dealer) and get some diagnostic work done. Like an actual oil pressure reading. 100,000 or so miles is not enough for the kind of wear this all suggests. Good luck.
 

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Most dealers are parts changers, so they only see a new motor as an option. I would get the oil and filter changed, the filter will collect any glitter like particles and smaller. The VVT-i will most likely not work correctly from contamination, I am not sure if that is correctable with a removal and cleaning of the phasers or if it is just a matter of cleaning the screens the oil flows through getting to the phasers. Fords have prescreens and they get clogged and sludged up, not sure about Toyota.

If you are unable to change the filter and oil your self, find an independent mechanic, tell him what is going on and ask if he will do a couple of oil and filter changes to see if the glitters still shows up or if any noises start to develope in the next 500 miles. I would do 2 oil changes 250 miles apart and look for particles and listen to noises then go from there.Found this
 

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Not an official mechanic, but I would get some of that "glitter" and see if it is hard metal or soft. If it's soft, bearings are likely, as they are made to be soft. Otherwise something has become wonkified in your timing chain, cam gears, crank gear or cam followers or something. You might also check your plugs - could have a broken oil ring - can see it easy if you have a single plug that is oil wet. Sometimes you can't see that small amount of oil burning at the tailpipe unless you put a coffee filter right at the end of it for about ten minutes.

You're gonna need to find someone who is old school - like the kind of old school who uses a broom handle to listen to the crankcase and 'hear' what the problem might be. The OBDII codes are too cryptic and interrelated to determine where metal is coming from, IMHO.

As others have said, dealerships are NOT the place to EVER have an engine swap done, and they have been known to take something simple like a timing chain replacement and get it wrong by leaving parts out of the kit. The weakest link in these motors is that timing chain and the bearings for the camshafts - the mains are nearly bulletproof. So if the metal is soft, it might just be bearings for the cams. If not it might be the timing chain or the gears.

I would try and find someone who builds engines for the speed crowd - they tend to know the innards pretty well.

If you are handy and have the time, you can get a crate engine and drop it in over a weekend - it's just swapping out everything on the outside of the long block. The ECU is plug and play. If you do that, be sure and take your time getting the upper cats off the block - the bolts tend to shear if you get to aggressive with them cold. The rest is wrenching and plug/unplug off the harnesses. Use contact cleaner on the old harness plugs when you start hooking everything up - will save some headaches.

And scribe your hood latch position with something sharp to make it lots easier to put the hood back on and lined up.

That's about all I can offer without getting my broom handle on your engine...
 
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