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:cheers:
Also, though not a practice I suggest, some sliders are wider just before the read wheel and you can use the slider as a pivot against rocks that are next to you.
The kick-out on a slider is OH SO FINE for using to hook and turn. Why not recommend this? I DO! :)

The other thing that's good about the kicker is that the FJ Cruiser is an IFS 4x4. That means that MOST of the suspension articulation is carried out by the rear axle. If you drive a single front wheel up onto an obstacle, it will cause body lean. However if you drive a single REAR wheel up onto the same obstacle, it will cause mostly suspension twist.

If you watch an FJC from the back, going through the rocks, you'll see it wag side to side on it's rear axle. The body will lean while the axle stays flat, depending on what the front wheels are doing. This tends to put the rear quarterpanel in jeopardy of smacking into rocks that you're already MOSTLY past.

The kicker helps fight this, by pushing the rear end away from obstacles that are *that* close by.

It really works!

Another thing about rock sliders on the FJC is that the side of the body has a convex curvature to it. It bulges outward as you go up the side. If the rock rail is close in, hugging the underside of the rocker panel, then its very possible to contact a rock with body metal before the slider even touches it.

The OEM sliders from Toyota are very subtle. They protect the rocker panel from underneath, but not so much the side of the vehicle, thanks to the curvature of the sides.
 

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The Toyota OEM sliders are actually quite strong and reasonably well made. Their failing is that they're so subtle and close-in that they offer limited protection. They're understated. They're designed for adding onto a car that may or may not be bought by someone who actually wheels the thing. Someone who never has interest in offroad driving might find a more obvious rock slider to be ill situated for their daily use and driving.
 

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They're strong enough for heavy use. Strength isn't a problem for them. They're too small is the problem.

You can lift the car by them, using a Hi-Lift but the shaft will get way too close to the body, because they're too small.
 
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