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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy y'all,
I'm a newbie owner of a 2010 FJ Cruiser, so please bear with me. I put the FJ in 4 Hi today and when I pulled out of my rocky sideyard and turned left it made a very expensive sounding clunk, but ran just fine after that. Later I drove it down to the walmart (about 5 mins. away) in 4 Hi and it was driving fine until I tried turn while I was in the parking lot. It shuttered and clunked, not as loud, but there were more clunks. So I switched it back to 2wd, no problems, rode perfect. When I left I switched it back to 4Hi and it was shuttering and doing small clunks again, so i just put it back in 2wd and no problems. I have a warranty on it, so fixing it is no problem, but does anyone know why it's doing that?
Thank y'all!
 

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Desert Moderator
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5,662 Posts
Howdy y'all,
I'm a newbie owner of a 2010 FJ Cruiser, so please bear with me. I put the FJ in 4 Hi today and when I pulled out of my rocky sideyard and turned left it made a very expensive sounding clunk, but ran just fine after that. Later I drove it down to the walmart (about 5 mins. away) in 4 Hi and it was driving fine until I tried turn while I was in the parking lot. It shuttered and clunked, not as loud, but there were more clunks. So I switched it back to 2wd, no problems, rode perfect. When I left I switched it back to 4Hi and it was shuttering and doing small clunks again, so i just put it back in 2wd and no problems. I have a warranty on it, so fixing it is no problem, but does anyone know why it's doing that?
Thank y'all!
It does that because it is a part time 4WD vehicle, not an AWD vehicle.
Part time 4WD (such as Automatic Trans FJs or Jeep Wrangler) are only intended to be put into 4WD on loose surfaces. This is because there is no centre differential, just a transfer case.

In the owners manual, it clearly states not to put the vehicle into 4WD (4H on the 4WD selector) on high traction surfaces (such as a sealed road) - only on dirt, mud, snow, sand etc... You should be driving in 2H in all but slippery conditions.

If you continue to put the vehicle in 4WD on high traction surfaces, then you will damage the driveline.
The manual transmission FJ is full time 4WD/AWD with a locking center diff / 2 speed transfer case, and should only be used in AWD mode (4H position on the 4WD selector) on high traction surfaces. Don't lock the centre diff on high traction surfaces (4HL on the selector)

I hope this helps
 

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MOAB SUPERSTAR
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Congrats! Looks like a sweet FJ :smile If you can test out 4hi on dirt for a while, make some turns and see if the noise is still there. If so, check your CV axles. Let us know what you find out!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, it's operator error then, ha ha. I am relieved. That's the great thing about doing these things, you'll never do it again. I'm used to AWD because that's what we had before the FJ. I read the owner's manual cover to cover and it didn't caution against driving it 4Hi on pavement, in fact in suggested driving in in 4Hi at least 10 miles a month so I took that as it was ok on pavement. So if I was on dirt an had to make a sharp turn, 4Hi would be ok?
 

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I read the owner's manual cover to cover and it didn't caution against driving it 4Hi on pavement, in fact in suggested driving in in 4Hi at least 10 miles a month so I took that as it was ok on pavement.
The first year the cautionary note about NOT driving on high-traction surfaces in 4WD appeared in the Owner's Manual was 2011:

H2 (high speed position, two-wheel drive)
Use this for normal driving on dry hard-surfaced roads. This position gives greater economy, quietest ride and least wear.

H4 (high speed position, four-wheel drive)
Use this for driving only on tracks that permit the tires slide, like offroad, icy or snow-covered roads. This position provides greater traction than two-wheel drive.
 
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