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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I ended up having to replace my steering rack. Wasn't leaking just had a good bit of play in it, most likely a result of 35" tires and lots of offroading. I bought a brand new rack from carsteering.com for $285 (no core) and decided to put it in myself (much cheaper than dealer who wanted $1600 installed). It has a 3yr warranty so we'll see if it holds up.

While I changed the rack, I decided to change a few other things.


Additional New Parts:
cv axles
whiteline swaybar endlinks
energy suspension swaybar bushings
swaybar lock collar
whiteline front differential mount bushings
spindle seals
diff output shaft seals


The FSM says to remove the trans/tcase and lift/tilt the engine to remove the steering rack. I thought, this can't be right, 10hrs for a steering rack. I did it in 5hrs, including the time it took for me to figure out how to do it without touching the engine/trans. Keep in mind, I'm not a professional mechanic.


So here's a basic breakdown of how to remove the rack.


1. Remove the front differential assembly (this sounds like a lot of work, but it really isn't, just make sure to have a 2nd set of hands to help with the weight, I wish I would have)

2. Remove outer tierod ends from rack

3. Drain the power steering (I just disconnected the return line in front of the rack)


4. Secure the steering wheel so it's centered and can't turn


5. Mark the steering shaft at the coupler with paint pen


6. Remove the 2 pinch bolts from the coupler and slide it up the column (mine was seized and required hitting it from under the vehicle with a long pry bar)

7. Remove the pinch bolt from the steering shaft at the rack and remove the steering shaft.


8. Remove the feed/return lines from the rack (including the clamp brackets that hold them to crossmember). The return line is held on with a hose clamp. The feed line will require a 17mm flared crows foot socket and 6" extension (like the picture) in order to remove the flared fitting (if you've never removed the feed line, there may be corrosion and/or dirt preventing it from loosening easily).





After you've loosened the feed line with the flared crows foot socket, you can use a regular wrench from the side to remove it faster


Lines removed from rack


After you've disconnected the lines, you can let them hang and finish draining



Now this is where the fsm would tell you to remove the trans/tcase and tilt the engine. The reason why is because you can't remove the 2 bolts holding the rack to the crossmember. The bolts hit the transmission lines and the A/C compressor. Can you guess what you do next?

9. Remove the 2 bolts on the passenger side of the engine block that hold the 2 clamp brackets for the transmission cooler lines. Now you have enough wiggle in the lines to remove the steering rack bolt on that side.

10. Remove the serpentine belt

11. Unplug the electrical connector at the A/C compressor and remove the 4 bolts holding it to the engine block, (easiest access through the drivers wheel well). You should now have enough wiggle room with the a/c lines still attached to lift the compressor up to remove the steering rack bolt on that side.

12. Push the tierod all the way to the passenger side and slide the rack to the passenger side until you can get the driver side inner tierod through the crossmember. Then pull the rack out.

13. With the rack removed, you can remove the low pressure return line fitting from the rack (hose barb fitting) with a 17mm deep socket. This part is not included with a replacement rack, so be sure to swap it to the new rack before install.

Installation is the reverse of removal, except you connect the steering shaft to the coupler (lining it up with the marks you made earlier) before the rack, but be sure to center the rack (L to R) in its travel before you connect the steering shaft

Torque specs for this job:

steering rack mounting bolts (2): 74 ft/lbs
steering rack high pressure feed line (1): 31-33 ft/lbs
steering rack low pressure return hose fitting (1): 31-33 ft/lbs
steering shaft/coupler pinch bolts (3): 27 ft/lbs
outer tie rod end castle nut (2): 67 ft/lbs
power steering lines in front of rack (2): 21 ft/lbs
transmission line clamp brackets (2): 10 ft/lbs
a/c compressor bolts (4): 18 ft/lbs

Sorry I didn't take more pictures, but it should help
 

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I Have a V-8!! Moderator
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Nice write up.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Update on the Aftermarket Steering Rack from carsteering.com:

It's shot.

5 months and about 1500mi and it's worse than the oem was when I replaced it.

Thought it was just a bad inner tie rod so I checked it,

and found this, (watch video)

https://youtu.be/2Vurbkquc2A

https://youtu.be/QjkeOv3ZAaw


turns out both inner and outer tie rods are fine, but the rack is no good. Let's see if they cover it under warranty
 

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Nice write up, but there is no need to remove the front dif assembly to do this.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Nice write up, but there is no need to remove the front dif assembly to do this.
Please elaborate. How can you remove the rack without removing the diff?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Update: The rack was covered under warranty. They covered all shipping costs. I put the new rack in, but discovered one half of a whiteline poly bushing for the front diff mount had chunks missing (pinion support bushing). The bushing was covered under warranty by whiteline, just waiting for it to arrive.
 

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I've got shot steering rack bushings in my '07. Rack is shifting side to side with steering input. Have new poly ones in hand (from Summit racing), and am trying to decide if I can get them in without removing the rack. Either way, the big problem bolts are an issue... they need to come out to replace the bushings.

What's dumb is: if the bolts went in from the bottom, rather from the top, then this wouldn't be a problem at all.

I am very close to sliding them up - cutting them (cutting the heads off), dropping the severed bolt-shafts out the bottom, hopefully replacing my bushing in-place, and then replacing them - with OEM bolts (part #9011912367 I think) inserted from underneath with lock-tite and nuts up on top.

Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've got shot steering rack bushings in my '07. Rack is shifting side to side with steering input. Have new poly ones in hand (from Summit racing), and am trying to decide if I can get them in without removing the rack. Either way, the big problem bolts are an issue... they need to come out to replace the bushings.

What's dumb is: if the bolts went in from the bottom, rather from the top, then this wouldn't be a problem at all.

I am very close to sliding them up - cutting them (cutting the heads off), dropping the severed bolt-shafts out the bottom, hopefully replacing my bushing in-place, and then replacing them - with OEM bolts (part #9011912367 I think) inserted from underneath with lock-tite and nuts up on top.

Thoughts?
Yes, you can cut the bolts. Keep in mind they are hardened bolts and will have to be cut with a grinder/cut-off wheel or you'll eat up hacksaw blades. Last time I changed the rack, I cut the bolts halfway(due to room) and tightened them using my impact to break them the rest of the way.

Yes, you can put the bolts in upside down. I installed the bolts upside down last time I changed the rack, with extra thread locker, and marked them with a paint pen to seem if they loosened. Still tight and haven't moved since torqued.

If you're buying new bolts, you should also get new nuts, they're ~$0.50, especially if you're installing upside down. The nuts are a mechanical lock nut and are only supposed to be torqued once. You can reuse them and they'll probably stay tight, but if you're buying new bolts you might as well get the nuts.

Keep in mind, the bushings aren't going to come out of the rack easy. I'm betting they're glued in, which means you're going to need heat or a lot of force. good luck
 

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Sanity check: is this normal for the (passenger side) rack bushing? Looks to be ovalized by design - is there supposed to be play, or is this just to ease assembly? My new poly bushings are round, with a round hole. I am a little worried about them going into this rack. (for now, I am just replacing the big bolts with upside down ones to make this job a little easier)
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Sanity check: is this normal for the (passenger side) rack bushing? Looks to be ovalized by design - is there supposed to be play, or is this just to ease assembly? My new poly bushings are round, with a round hole. I am a little worried about them going into this rack. (for now, I am just replacing the big bolts with upside down ones to make this job a little easier)
Yes that is normal. Passenger side bushing is slotted/oval shaped (look at pic in first post). Not sure of the exact reason for it being slotted as the hole in the frame crossmember is not slotted and the driver side is not, so once the driver side bolt is in, there shouldn't be much movement. I am doubtful that a round bushing fits in there. You won't know until you take it apart and those bushings are not available from Toyota, have to buy the whole rack.
The rack I bought from carsteering.com 9 months ago for $300 (that lasted 5months) is now $1200. Oem Toyota rack (lasted 7yrs) is $700, go figure

You could try sanding the new bushing to match the shape of the old bushing, but if you take off too much, you're back to the beginning
 

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Did you ever find a replacement for the steering rack bushings?

-B
 

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I've got shot steering rack bushings in my '07. Rack is shifting side to side with steering input. Have new poly ones in hand (from Summit racing), and am trying to decide if I can get them in without removing the rack. Either way, the big problem bolts are an issue... they need to come out to replace the bushings.

What's dumb is: if the bolts went in from the bottom, rather from the top, then this wouldn't be a problem at all.

I am very close to sliding them up - cutting them (cutting the heads off), dropping the severed bolt-shafts out the bottom, hopefully replacing my bushing in-place, and then replacing them - with OEM bolts (part #9011912367 I think) inserted from underneath with lock-tite and nuts up on top.

Thoughts?
Old thread I know. Did this end up being the correct part number for the bolts? In the process of changing mine out now and I am over trying to save the bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Old thread I know. Did this end up being the correct part number for the bolts? In the process of changing mine out now and I am over trying to save the bolts.
That's the part number I found, for 07-09. 2010+ might be different. The flange nut is #9017812016

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

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Good memory @debFJVT . It ended up being my intermediate shaft a few years ago and I got it replaced. I'm wondering if there were more issues hidden (steering rack) than i thought. It actually blew oil out the side and is almost impossible to steer.
 

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Woah! Yeah I’d guess so...good thing you weren’t out in the middle of the desert. I remembered it because I was starting to have steering rack issues too, and not long after did swap to a new OE rack, pump and added a cooler. GL and let us know what you find!
 
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