Toyota FJ Cruiser Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a stock FJ with rock rails and tow package. I got stuck in the mud last week and had problems finding a place where I could use my Hi-Lift jack without damaging my truck.

I used the hitch to lift the rear wheels up.

I have a tried to lift the front wheel but the tire is recessed and the jack scrapped the fender. Would a 2x4 or 4x4 between the jack and the tire work to move the jack away from the body?

Also, can you lift the truck on the rockrails? That would make recovery a lot easier.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,734 Posts
You can get a slider adapter from Overland XT or wabFab for the sliders, also there is an attachment called Lift Mate that has hooks for your rims. Don't take this the wrong way, If you havn't already done it, youtube search the hi lift operation and maybe the options I mentioned. It is a wonderful tool, but it can harm or kill you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Look up Wab Fab, they have something for you! ;)
Don't get wab fab. They literally lake 6months to complete orders. I'm not alone in this experience.

If you are planning on wheeling a lot got yourself some sliders that come out a little bit so that putting a high lift on them is not such a sketchy operation.

All it would take is a small shift of the vehicle on the stock slider to ding the body paneling.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,793 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
If you get a receiver hitch D Ring Shackle you can use the Hi Lift there as well.
I'd have some concerns about lifting the FJ by the trailer hitch. The hitch may be rated at 5000 pounds for towing but tongue weight is rated at 500 pounds I believe so lifting at that point would also be rated at 500 pounds if I'm correct.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,174 Posts
I'd have some concerns about lifting the FJ by the trailer hitch. The hitch may be rated at 5000 pounds for towing but tongue weight is rated at 500 pounds I believe so lifting at that point would also be rated at 500 pounds if I'm correct.
I've never tried it personally but saw Bill Burk do it in his "Getting Unstuck" video so I figured it was a viable option. As with any Hi Lift operation a great deal of care should be taken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
I'd have some concerns about lifting the FJ by the trailer hitch. The hitch may be rated at 5000 pounds for towing but tongue weight is rated at 500 pounds I believe so lifting at that point would also be rated at 500 pounds if I'm correct.
I've never tried it personally but saw Bill Burk do it in his "Getting Unstuck" video so I figured it was a viable option. As with any Hi Lift operation a great deal of care should be taken.
One of the '08 FJ brochures from Toyota showed in detail how to move the FJ to the side using a hi-lift in the receiver.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
I'd have some concerns about lifting the FJ by the trailer hitch. The hitch may be rated at 5000 pounds for towing but tongue weight is rated at 500 pounds I believe so lifting at that point would also be rated at 500 pounds if I'm correct.
Tongue weight is a factor in vehicle control while towing, not an indicator of hitch strength. Using this for a jack point is a well accepted practice.

This is the Lift Mate mentioned earlier, very handy:


And here is an example of a tube aadapter for use with your rock rails:


The best way to avoid damage to your doors is to simply open them. The Hi-Lift jack is something that must be learned and practiced. After some use you get to know what angle to set the standard at for a given distance of lift needed, and what points to use for the most efficient use of time and available recovery resources.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
Got a question for you guys. Is there any difference between the high lift jacks sold for off road usage and a 48'' farm jack? The farm jacks are about half the price of the off road ones.

Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Not really. The most popular brand of jack sold for offroad use happens to be Hi-Lift, and they are extremely well made, well designed for offroad applications, and easy to care for. But farm jacks are generally the same thing. It comes down to trust in the equipment you have. For myself, I trust my Hi-Lift to operate in a consistant and predictable manner every time I use it. This is importanat to me because I know, and accept, that this is a potentially dangerous piece of equipment, so I want the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
i know and have seen people who got hi lift jack because they looked cool, get to the train and dont know how to use them are what the can do , (winch , lift ,squeeze, ect ) are where to lift ther rig from , idk what they are thinking but you should know how to use the equipment before you go offroad , and should have tryed it out and seen where to jack ya rig up and so on , to me that common sense , what allot of america lacks now days
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,793 Posts
I have reservations about using the hitch receiver as a lifting point. Lifting from the center line of the vehicle is not a smart idea when using a jack like the Hi-Lift that can very easily fall over. I have tried this a few times in my driveway and every time it has felt unsafe. Rock rails are a much better way to do this, or a steel bumper and lifting from the sides or via shackles, so that you are only lifting one corner of the vehicle, not the whole back half.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
I have reservations about using the hitch receiver as a lifting point.
I would not recommend it if at all possible-VERY unstable lift. I have done it, but there was no other option.
Got a question for you guys. Is there any difference between the high lift jacks sold for off road usage and a 48'' farm jack? The farm jacks are about half the price of the off road ones.
I had a "farm jack" that I used a few times. Every time I used it the base would bend a different way. The thing was cheap and scared me. Get a hi-lift. The removable handle is nice too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
yea the farm jack i was looking at is a buffalo brand, kinda wondered about the quality. What length do I need, 48''?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
The 48" is fine for stock or 3" lifted FJs for most situations. The higher the lift and more wheel travel you build into your suspension, the more you will need that 60" standard. Also, some recovery situations, such as lifting the body off of a particularly tall rock/stump/vw you find yourself high-pointed on, may require the taller standard as well.

As far as lifting from the receiver hitch... I can think of one situation where using this jack point is perfect because of it's instability. That's when you need the back of your FJ moved to the side a few inches. Like when you cannot move without the rear quarter panels of your rig ending up in a tree or rock. Also, in sticky mud where all four tires are out of traction and a simple pole vault to the side will give the extra bite needed. Since I have jack points on the front bumper I can move the front as well. Once I shifted my FJ about 7 feet to the right onto better ground when I got stuck badly in a mud hole. I did this with just the hitch receiver (with shackle installed), the front ARB bumper, and a 48" Hi Lift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Got a question for you guys. Is there any difference between the high lift jacks sold for off road usage and a 48'' farm jack? The farm jacks are about half the price of the off road ones.

Thanks
I do not think that you can get repair parts for the farm jacks like those sold at Harbor Freight or Tractor Supply. If you can repair something, better yet have spare parts w/ you, you will save a lot more in the long run. Also there are lots of accessories made for the Hi-lift that may not work w/ others.

:cheers:
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top