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What do the manufacturers do? I can't see them running brand new vehicles up to 40 mph with hard to moderate stops 6-10 times.
OE pads are best left alone (but I don't think it's foolproof). Say that you tend to ride your brake pedal or have a heavy foot with 0 miles, you might cause premature issues. Most people drive their new car pretty easy for the first few trips, don't they?


I wonder what coating is on centric calipers…it's as good as bare metal lol
Iron-clad. It's derived from ancient times.
 

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OE pads are best left alone (but I don't think it's foolproof). Say that you tend to ride your brake pedal or have a heavy foot with 0 miles, you might cause premature issues. Most people drive their new car pretty easy for the first few trips, don't they?



Run the crap out of it if you want a good running car. Baby it and it'll be a pooch.

I actually meant manufacturers don't seem to 'break in new pads on brand new vehicles.
 

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Yup. I meant, that's the factory procedure. Read the manual, but who reads these days am i right?!
Sooo, no break in at all since they leave it up to us.. Many get a lot of miles out of them but I forgot with my first FJ 'I bought new' the rears wore out very fast and I had to replace them. I can't remember the mileage I changed them at but It happened awhile before I sold it. It had 27k miles when it sold so probably changed at 15k miles or so.
 

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Run the crap out of it if you want a good running car. Baby it and it'll be a pooch.
Pretty much this. Here's the theory from Centric (and similar to Stoptech's) @Iconic_

FAQ #1: How can I tell if my brakes are bedded-in?
This is a question without a single definitive answer; however, there are visual indicators on the
rotor itself which can help determine the state of the bed-in.
1. Rotor discoloration. Typically, there will be a bluish tint to a used rotor which is from heat. A
more important color is a grayish tint or film on the face of the rotor where the pads touch. This
color is actually from the pad material building up and is the best indication of how much pad
material is adhered to the rotor. In general, if the rotor face is still shiny there is not enough
pad material built up. Note that different pads will generate different appearances, so take
notice of how the rotor appears before starting the bed-in process so you can recognize any
difference after.
2. Machining marks. On a new rotor, you can often use machining marks on the rotor face to
assess the state of the bed-in. Typically, there will be either very slight grooves from turning the
rotor (like a vinyl record – ask your parents) or more random marks from grinding the rotor
surface during manufacturing. Prior to starting the bed-in process take a mental picture of the
machining marks. If they are still very prominent following bed-in, you may not be bedding-in
aggressively enough. In general it's alright if there are still slight traces of the machining marks
after a few bed-in cycles, but you should definitely see them starting to go away.

And what I think is happening to most people going easy on their brakes, 5/10k/xx miles later @darkhorse13
FAQ #3: What do you mean I “un-bedded” the brakes?
If any brake pad is used below its adherent operating temperature, it will create friction
through primarily abrasive mechanisms, slowly but surely removing the transfer layer on the
rotor. For this reason, most street/performance pads like to be driven just a little bit
aggressively every now and again to maintain a proper transfer layer of pad material on the
rotor face.
If the brakes are used passively for an extended period of time, the transfer layer can be
completely removed, effectively un-bedding the brakes. The brake system will still perform well
under normal driving conditions, but before heading to the autocross or your favorite canyon
back road you will want to perform a bed-in procedure. Failing to do so will only increase the
risk of TV generation.

Sooo, no break in at all since they leave it up to us.. Many get a lot of miles out of them but I forgot with my first FJ 'I bought new' the rears wore out very fast and I had to replace them.
That sounds freakish. You'll most likely change front pads 2-3 times before you change the rears.
 

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For group knowledge. I put 37" tires on my FJ. Even with the brakes fully upgraded using all the 5th gen parts in this thread, I am unable to lock up the tires while braking on smooth pavement. With my 34's it was easy, and 35's I'm pretty sure its do able. But finally I am increasing first stop (cold brakes) stopping distance due to tire size increase. I'd still say that's pretty good though if 35"+ is the limit for our vehicles. Jeep JK's can't even lock up 35's with "BBK's"

I'd like to get the RR racing 6 piston caliper upgrade someday and test it also.
 

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For group knowledge. I put 37" tires on my FJ. Even with the brakes fully upgraded using all the 5th gen parts in this thread, I am unable to lock up the tires while braking on smooth pavement. With my 34's it was easy, and 35's I'm pretty sure its do able. But finally I am increasing first stop (cold brakes) stopping distance due to tire size increase. I'd still say that's pretty good though if 35"+ is the limit for our vehicles. Jeep JK's can't even lock up 35's with "BBK's"

I'd like to get the RR racing 6 piston caliper upgrade someday and test it also.
What’s tire weight on the 37” compared to the 35”
 

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Yeah that’s a big difference in weight , what about mpg ?
I've only had them on a week, not even a full tank yet. Actually I'm gonna be going back to my 34's for now until I can fit them easier. The weight is definitely noticeable.
 

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66 lbs vs 75 lbs for the STT Pro's.
Jus like you, I'd definitely consider an aftermarket caliper after moving to bigger tires when/if it becomes an issue. Stoptech or Wilwood would do quite nicely. Matching performance with the hardware. Who knew we'd be dipping into the 100lb unsprung wheel weight.
 

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Jus like you, I'd definitely consider an aftermarket caliper after moving to bigger tires when/if it becomes an issue. Stoptech or Wilwood would do quite nicely. Matching performance with the hardware. Who knew we'd be dipping into the 100lb unsprung wheel weight.
I like the RR racing because they actually pair Wilwoods with OE Centric 5th Gen 4runner rotors, which most of us in this thread already have.

https://www.rr-racing.com/RR-Racing-Front-Big-Brake-Kit-for-Lexus-GX-4Runner-p/gx4fbk0002.htm
 

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I've only had them on a week, not even a full tank yet. Actually I'm gonna be going back to my 34's for now until I can fit them easier. The weight is definitely noticeable.
Idk man yeah 37” are probably pushing the limits of an FJ unless you went with a solid axle and a LS v8 swap engine
 

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What do the manufacturers do? I can't see them running brand new vehicles up to 40 mph with hard to moderate stops 6-10 times. Still some guys are getting over 100k miles out of originals... using machines???
FWIW: These were the directions (50MPH, hard brake, rinse and repeat 5-6 times) that came with the TRD BBK that was factory installed at the port on my 2012 TTSE.
 

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FWIW: These were the directions (50MPH, hard brake, rinse and repeat 5-6 times) that came with the TRD BBK that was factory installed at the port on my 2012 TTSE.
Yea, that's pretty much the same as Centric recommends. I just was pointing out new vehicle brakes seem to last a lot longer even though I don't believe auto manufacturers are taking newborn vehicles through these break in procedures.
 

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Yea, that's pretty much the same as Centric recommends. I just was pointing out new vehicle brakes seem to last a lot longer even though I don't believe auto manufacturers are taking newborn vehicles through these break in procedures.
I think the reason for that is that Centric/StopTech makes the Rotors for the TRD BBK used on the FJC.
FWIW: Our 2007 FJ (factory brakes) seems to last longer on the brakes than the 2012 TTSE w/the TRD BBK system.
 
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