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So I went to change the oil for the first time since buying my FJ. Long story short, I cannot get the oil plug off the oil pan. I'm not sure if someone tightened it to tight, or it has some rust (the FJ sat for periods of time as it was my dad's, and he used his company work truck 95% of the time). I was going to do an oil change with an expensive "advance stage" oil filter made with hugh quality synthetic material or whatever (claims to be good for up to 20,000 miles with the proper oil) and advanced synthetic mobile1 (Also claims to be good for up to 20,000 miles with the proper filter), but I also have a coupon for a free full synthetic valvoline oil change at a local regional corporate shop. I thought I'd just take it in to them and get a free oil change that was still high quality, and I figured they probably had a lot more experience with "stuck" oil drain plugs, as this is the first time changing my own oil, ever. Well it wasn't there for 10 minutes before they come tell me they can't get the drain plug out. Manager said "they were gonna take an impact to it but I told em not to do that without talking to you first and at least having an oil pan on hand." But he said he was betting I'd need a whole new oil pan. So I'm gonna get underneath her and make sure the bolts that attach the oil pan aren't rusted and are loose enough for me to remove them. If they are, I'm thinking I'll buy an oil pan to have on hand, and take an impact to the drain plug. I figure worse case scenario is I strip the plug and have to replace the oil pan, which I'll already have. Best case scenario is it comes loose with the impact, didn't strip, bolt and oil pan are fine, and I'll return the back up oil pan. Is there any issues with this plan? Any tips or suggestions on how to loosen this drain plug? And, if the unthinkable happens, what's gonna be the prognosis if ibget up underneath this thing and the bolts that hold the oil pan are too tight or rusted for me to loosen? Any insight would be appreciated as I'm not mechanically inclined at all. I'm 28 years old, as I said this is the first time doing my own oil change, and this is the first truck I've owned. I'm pretty confident in myself and my ability to learn. I'm not some dumb kid who went to private school and doesn't know how to change oil or a tire or a battery. I have a fair knowledge of vehicles, and understand the concepts of basic and advanced mechanics. Its just something I've never had to do. So I believe I have the ability and know how to do this type of work on my own vehicle, I'm just running into obstacles. Please help!
 

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The drain plug threads won't be 'rusted' because they are continuously submerged in oil, correct?

Just put an 18" breaker bar on your 6-point socket and remove the plug .... making ABSOLUTELY SURE you are turning it CCW as viewed from below.

If the female threads in the pan are hopelessly damaged, the quick fix is to install a slightly oversize plug via an oil drain plug repair kit.

With your apparent lack of hands-on wrenching experience, I'd recommend NOT trying to replace the oil pan yourself. Breaking off one of the little M6 bolts, or stripping out the threads in the aluminum upper oil pan would bring on a new level of nightmare.

And, if you want to keep your new FJ running for a long time, completely purge your brain of any nonsense about 20,000 mile oil changes. Use OEM Toyota oil filters, a good-quality synthetic 10W-30 motor oil (like Mobil-1) and change the oil at 6 - 8K mile intervals, depending on how the vehicle is driven. If the normal pattern is only long, constant-speed freeway driving at 65+ MPH, you may be able to stretch the OCIs to 8K, but have an oil analysis performed occasionally to confirm the oil is still in good health. If your daily driving is lots of short trips in cold weather, then stay closer to Toyota's recommended 5K mile OCI.
 

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Just checking since this is your first time changing oil. Are you turning the bolt the right direction? Righty tighty...Lefty loosey :)
 

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Make sure you aren't trying to take the transmission plug out......

It does seem odd they had so much trouble on a bolt that is submerged in oil.... but crap happens I guess.

Proper application of heat to a seized bolt has saved me from busting many bolts.

If you were to go this route I would use a MAP gas torch as they are hotter than propane.
 

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All good advice above! I can't imagine using an impact on the drain plug. A good breaker bar with a 6 point socket (less chance of rounding the plug than with a 12 point) and some patience.

And for what it's worth, my kids went to private school and they are both very capable mechanically. Probably because I always showed them. School had nothing to do with it.
 

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2011 FJ Cruiser - Iceberg - 4x4 - Automatic - Offroad Package - Convenience Package
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I recently changed all fluids (engine, front diff, transfer case, rear diff) and could not believe how tight some of the plugs had been tightened. I could not remove them with a standard 1/2" ratchet. I broke out my 18" x 1/2" breaker bar and it was still scary how much leverage I had to apply to get them to break.
 

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I had a rear dif fill plug hopelessly seized, head stripped. Welded a length of steel to the head and busted it loose.

Good luck
I think the most common cause of stripped driving recesses in Toyota fill plugs is trying to use a 3/8" hex wrench instead of the correct 10mm hex wrench. 3/8' seems to fit, just maybe a little loose, but those plugs are incredibly tight from the factory. Unless you use a good-quality 10mm wrench, fully inserted into a clean recess, and held perfectly on-center when applying torque, you are at risk of stripping the recess.

German tool supplier Hazet makes a beautifully designed but expensive wrench for Mercedes oil drain plugs, but it has a 14mm hex instead of the 10mm hex used by Toyota. I haven't been able to find a similar tool in 10mm.

Bicycle part Tool Auto part Font Metal
 

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I had a rear dif fill plug hopelessly seized, head stripped. Welded a length of steel to the head and busted it loose.

Good luck
I did the same thing to a bolt to get my skid plates off.... steel bolts and aluminum plates/blocks don't mix well.
 
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Unless you goop them up with anti-seize during installation.
I used PILES of anti-seize... around here it still gets corroded... I use anti-seize on EVERY bolt I ever put in for every mod.

EDIT: Although... I did learn that there are different versions of anti-seize.... and some that isn't great for aluminum... of which I started with, lol. I've switched to the nickle one rather than the copper one.
 
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I used PILES of anti-seize... around here it still gets corroded... I use anti-seize on EVERY bolt I ever put in for every mod.

EDIT: Although... I did learn that there are different versions of anti-seize.... and some that isn't great for aluminum... of which I started with, lol. I've switched to the nickle one rather than the copper one.
For full anti-seize protection with through-holes (where the threaded end of the bolt is exposed to salty road slush, etc.) you initially need to coat the male bolt threads as well as the female threads. I use a nylon bore brush (.243, .30, or .38 cal., depending on thread size) dipped in anti-seize and 'threaded' into the hole to ensure that every part of the female thread gets coated. Otherwise, if you only coat the male thread, much of the anti-seize at the leading end of the bolt gets scraped off as the bolt enters the female threads.

One problem with using anti-seize is that it reduces the friction in the threads and under the bolt head dramatically, and bolts have a tendency to loosen under vibration even if they are torqued to spec.

And never, NEVER use anti-seize on wheel studs or lug nuts.

I've used only moly-disulphide based anti-seize compounds for the past 45 years, and never had any issues with seized threads. My dad always had a big can of MolyKote in the garage, and after that was gone I ended up with another 5 lb can of some other brand of moly-based material.
 
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