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The Laughing Member
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I remember seeing somewhere on the net once and window film that goes on like window tint and it bullet proof..
I seriously doubt that any aftermarket film application will make a window "bullet-proof." Most bullet-resistant windows are made up of multiple layers of glass with relatively thick resin sandwiched in between, thus making the windows up to one to two inches thick.

As far as being truly bullet-proof, even the windows on heavily armored vehicles will eventually succumb after multiple bullet strikes.
 

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I seriously doubt that any aftermarket film application will make a window "bullet-proof." Most bullet-resistant windows are made up of multiple layers of glass with relatively thick resin sandwiched in between, thus making the windows up to one to two inches thick.

As far as being truly bullet-proof, even the windows on heavily armored vehicles will eventually succumb after multiple bullet strikes.
I don't know, I remember seeing a demo video and it took a lot before penetration through the film. Maybe not bullet proof but it certainly held up a lot longer than a regular window did..
 

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I have something I think everyone should have, get a bright neon orange blanket or tarp at least 5x8, many people on here like to use camo style colors on the exterior of their fj but in a situation were someone is looking for you and you need to be rescued, blending in to your surroundings will not help. You can put that neon green tarp/blanket on the roof to stand out more. My other idea if a tarp is too big is to cut it, 2x8 pieces will work and keep 2 in the fj, if you have a roof awning, take the two pieces and make an x on your awning top.
 

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Here is a link to creating a bug out bag:

Bug Out Bag – The 7 Types of Gear You Must Have to Survive

In case you are stuck on a tarmac for hours and toilets are maxed out or you are in some kind of bad traffic jam where you can't drive off the freeway, I carry a disposable urinal in my back pack and in all cars. When you pee in it, it turns to gel and can be used 3 times.

TravelJohn Disposable Urinal for Men, Women & Children, 3 ea Reviews | Buzzillions.com

I travel frequently and so I always have a mini bug out bag with me at all times. TSA has no problems with my signal mirror, emergency strobe light, sewing kit with scissors, gas mask with fire protection hood, caribiner, binos, Surefire 80 lumens, extra batteries. Every once in a while they do question me about my gas mask, but when I tell them it's in case of a hotel fire they understand.
 

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A-Team Moderator
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Technon | Breath of Life™ Emergency Escape Mask

Welcome to Tactical Medical Packs.

I was thinking in addition to a good shovel & axe; bolt cutters, sledgehammer and Halligan tool, cause you never know :rolleyes: Maybe Quickfist them to the rear door using a rack type system for easy attachment?

FYI for you Divers out there that want air for your tires, but cannot afford a system or compressor, use a small 65 cu.ft. tank (an 80 will work too, was considering size/avail. space) w/ a 1st stage reg and a BCD hose, purchase a tire valve quick connect $10-$14. This hose carries intermediate-pressure air from the regulator first stage to the Buoyancy Compensator's (BC) inflator, add the quick connect tire inflator here. Normally used to quickly fill inner tube floats that carry the DIVE flag. You can also get a blow gun to blow dirt out of your rig.
 

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One person mentioned a series called Man VS Wild on discovery. The so called survival expert gives wreckless advice. I could go on and on about the stupidity of this guy but that is off subject. If you want TRUE survival tips you need to look up "survivorman" this guy gives safe, smart, and effective tips. and like one other person wrote the best survival tool is knowledge.
 

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Most of the info here is great and well worth listening too. There are a couple of items that should be considered. First choice of a knife for survival...try to avoid the oversized "Rambo" types and get something that can actually be used. A good Swiss Army knife is a high value item in those kinds of situations. The next is a sticky subject with some but as a retired LEO who has responded to and taken reports from people who were harrassed while off road and in some cases much worse, think about a sidearm. In lots of places in the Rocky Mountain West, you'll be a long way from help. Predators aren't always two legged either. Some of the four legged varieties can be particularly dangerous, especially during lean times. Lots of states wouldn't allow you to have one, I know. But others will and if you are a long way from nowhere they can be a good tool. If you are in a restrictive state, you can investigate your local laws and see what it takes to have a permit. For this purpose don't forget to get something that will allow you to use shot shells, if the need arises. All calibers don't come in shotshells. My personal knife in my survival kit is a Neeley hunter. Not cheap but they work, have a survival kit in the handle, and are made and were designed by someone who taught survival at the JFK Special Warfare Center during the vietnam years. I used the same knife when I'm hunting but out of season it resides in my survival kit.
 

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In a pinch (worst case scenario)...

Your owners manual contains tinder.

The vanity mirror and rear view mirror can be used for signaling.

The wheel caps can be used for boiling water (after you cook off the grease and paint).

Spare tires make great signal smoke in snow country.

Windshield wiper fluid can clean your hands.

You can suck gas from your fuel tank using the windshield wiper fluid tubes...

Most important, is always file a flight plan and stick to it. Your loved ones want you back, and will stop at nothing to find you.
Sorry to resurrect such an old thread, but I love this advice.

Old school is the best school...
 

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Greetings all,

I previously worked at TRD in Costa Mesa (lost my job due to reorg - they wanted my headcount for more engineers). Anyway, I am desperately looking for a photo of the FJ survival tool Toyota came out with a few years back (I think it cost about $20 MSRP). It was of the kind to be hung on the neck, and had a compass, whistle and a few other things on it. I've googled, ebayed and searched my boxes of TRD junk but can't find the tool, and as I said, I'm desperate for a photo. Anyone have one they could do a quick pic of and post or e-mail to me? Unfortunately I need it rather quickly - like today (10/25/12).

I'll send a TRD hat from my collection to anyone who can get it to me by 5:00 PDT on 10/25/2012.

Luny

PS, I'm not sure how this forum works or if I'm posting correctly, so if I screwed up, my apologies.
 

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awesome thread, took me 3 days to get through all of it, but worth it - ive always had a compact survival kit when flyfishing the backcountry, gonna put together a similar but more well rounded kit for the FJ - found a few great additions to my kit to b sure...
 

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Basic tool kit with in. and metric, jumper cables, tow rope, bungee cords, small amounts of oil, tranny, steering, brake and coolant fluid, tactical tomahawk, MRE's, Bug out Bag, battle rifle, batteries, solar panel, condiments, and few clothes. That is the rough list but I have yet to upgrade some of my materials that would help with space and weight. My main concern is gas, water, ammo and food.
 

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my FJ ALWAYS has a shovel, axe, rope, my BIG knife, pistol, stinger rechargable flashlight, small tool set, water proof coat, maps/handheld GPS, and my backpack which contians a compass, water sealed matches/flint striker, ENO hammock, glow sticks, smaller flashlight, small knife and Clif bars.
 
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