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Discussion Starter #1
Well, after just getting my wife's new to us 2011 FJ back on the road by getting the correct amount of transmission fluid in it I ran into another issue. I had just finished extending the rear diff. breather and replacing diff fluid when I noticed a glob of grease on the driver side lower control arm
.......well ****.


I found the hole in the boot, and it is a tiny little pinhole I could just fit a jeweler's screwdriver into. Is there a good way to seal this boot until I can get a good toyota replacement kit? Are the parts stores boots even worth the trouble of installing?

Where can I find normal worm gear clamps that will work on the new boot without needing that special tool?

The CV is still good I think, it doesn't click, and I think the small hole happened today (we were on a dirt road back in the woods) the grease was only thrown onto the brake caliper and lower control arm so I'm convinced it's just that small hole.
 

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Replacing a CV boot is just about a waste of time anymore. You can get good quality CV shafts for under $100 now. I recommend rockauto.com. The heavy duty CV shafts are around $60-$70. I've replaced both of mine on my '13 due to boot damage over the years. Haven't had any problems.

You can also send your CV shafts to them and they will rebuild it.

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MOAB SUPERSTAR
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A tiny hole will likely not let in enough grit to destroy the joint, so driving it is probably fine, just messy. I’ve driven across the country with a torn boot, but in the end I do believe it prematurely aged the axle. As for replacements there has long been debate about OE vs aftermarket and I’m solidly on the OE side because I wheel hard. I love CVJ Axles - it’s so easy to get a beautifully rebuilt axle (with optional high angle red silicone inner boot!) then send in your axle for a core charge refund! Great company and price 👍
 

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I'm with Deb, in the "OEM only" camp. Here's why: my other car is a Camry with 200k miles on it (so far). The OEM half shafts eventually tore their boots and I went aftermarket assembly instead of the messy and time consuming, but not expensive boot replacement. Then, during the next 50k miles, each of them failed on me. One the internal splines where the CV joint meets the shaft spun. The other, the inner CV joint came apart and the half shaft flailed around, cracking my transmission housing.

Both times required a tow home, buying another half shaft + labor + time.

The OEM ones had lasted way longer, and had only been replaced because I was too lazy to replace the boots when the time came. The aftermarket replacements cost me far, far more than a brand new pair of OEM assemblies would have cost, in time and labor and money (not to mention a strip down and weld repair of the cracked transmission housing!).

Nothing but OEM for me, from now on.

Norm
 

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To replace the CV boots is messy, you'll go through a whole roll of paper towels getting all the old grease out when you take them apart, but when caught like yours was, replacing the boots is the best way to keep an OE pair of half shafts lasting as long as is physically possible.
 

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I second rockauto. I replaced both of mine with no problems. That little tear wont be little for long :) They are easy to replace
 

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2013 Trail Teams #181/2500<>< <*((^(((><
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Is there a way to seal the hole or rotate the boot away from the bottom. Replacement is always best.

<>< <>< <>< <*((^(((><
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Man, I did not feel like taking this front wheel apart again. I literally JUST finished replacing both front hub assemblies.

I have what I'm pretty sure is a cardone heavy duty axle on my LX470 and haven't had any issues. I wheel it but not super hard.

I hate to replace a whole OEM axle for a tiny little pinhole though, and I don't want the truck sitting around for a week waiting on parts, or sending the OEM in for a rebuild.

I'm on the fence, I'm going to call local Toyota dealers and see if they have a boot kit in stock I guess.

Is there a way to prevent this on a lifted truck? The angles really dont look severe to me at all even with a 2.5" lift
 

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Never tried before. My first thought was to heat up the rubber and pinch it together but then again there’s all that grease wouldn’t want to burn up your Fj. Hopefully someone else will have some ideas. If you try to seal it you have to get all the grease off of the air or nothing will stick. Could be a waste of time but maybe not.

<>< <>< <><. <*((^(((><
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I ordered a boot kit from pureFJ.com I'm going to use some Shoe Goo on the tiny hole to keep the grease in until the boots come in.

Crazy I could buy a whole Heavy duty CV for the price of Toyota boots. Anyone have any experience with the Cardone HD cv axles?
 

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Crazy Glue. A drop on the hole, squeeze together and you'll be good for a while.

Crazy Glue works very well to bond rubber together,
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Crazy Glue. A drop on the hole, squeeze together and you'll be good for a while.

Crazy Glue works very well to bond rubber together,
I cleaned the grease, wiped with mineral spirits and then used loctite "shoe glue".

I ordered a reboot kit, we'll see how long this lasts before I actually have to pull the CV. I'm pretty sure these are OEM axles so I don't want to replace them even if rebooting is a pain in the ass.
 

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About a year and a half ago As I was changing my oil, I noted that my 07 driver side cv boot was ripped a little. i Was not sure how long the rip had been there, or what condition the joint was in, so I bought a replacement for $80 and swapped them out. Examining my oem unit, I found that it was in great condition, so I bought a set of boots and replaced them. so now I have an aftermarket one on my driver side and an oem with new boots in my garage as stand by for when my passenger side boots give out. When that happens I’ll swap it out with my extra oem one, And then replace the passenger cv boots with new ones in anticipation of the driver side aftermarket one going sometime in the future. very little down time this way.
 

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Use Aquaseal urethane repair adhesive for pinholes and small tears in CV boots. Had slight tear in one boot, applied Aquaseal (wear gloves - very tacky) let set and dry. Dries clear and flexible. 30K+ miles and no issues or further tearing.
Works for ball joint or tie rod boot tears too.
 
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