Toyota FJ Cruiser Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody else running Toyo MT3s in an E rating, and what pressure have you found to produce maximum ride quality, mileage, and longevity? The Toyo website has my maximum pressure at 80psi! I have been running mine at 43 psi. Anybody else with any experience with these?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,794 Posts
While I do not have experience with the Toyo MT E rated tire, I do know a thing or two about load ratings and tire pressure and since you mentioned the max of 80 psi here is my advice. That E rated tire is meant to haul the manufactures max rated load at that 80 psi. I'm guessing on size here but I looked up LT285/70-17 E Toyo MT's and see that its rated at 3195 lbs each tire at 80 psi. The good thing is one tire can almost haul your entire FJ's weight lol. Those tires are primarily made for 3/4 ton and 1 ton pickups that are designed to haul a heavy load. Either way, on your much lighter FJ that does not pull a load you can forget about the 80 psi max and run what is most comfortable since the sidewall is not going to flex much. Personally I would say about 30 PSI and would guess at 43 psi the ride could be quite harsh. At 80 PSI the ride would be unbearable on an FJ.

Somebody else on here with E rated tires might tell you what they run.

So basically, the more load required of the tire, the more pressure I must run to match it. In the case of the FJ its lightweight enough to not come anywhere near the max load of a E rated tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Low 40's cold seems to be a good medium between still having some compliance while not being too squirmy in my experience. YMMV depending on the rig and tire but like @Iconic_ said you got plenty of room to experiment on an E load.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
337 Posts
I have been running E-rated tires for years. Keeps me from slashing sidewalls on the sharp NE rocks up here. I run Nitto 285/75-17 at 40 psi all of the time. ride is not harsh at all, and they seem to wear evenly. some of the guys i wheel with run at 34-ish, but i am not sure if the have e-rated tires.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BIOHZRD

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,529 Posts
What tire size? These FJs are generally light for an E-rated tire. I run my 35x12.5 E-rated tires at a lot lower pressure than my old 265/70 E-rated tires. All that extra air holds a lot of weight. On the larger tires, I'm usually around 30psi on the street for nice even wear. I miss D-rated tires for their lighter weight and the resulting acceleration, handling and mpg benefits...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What tire size? These FJs are generally light for an E-rated tire. I run my 35x12.5 E-rated tires at a lot lower pressure than my old 265/70 E-rated tires. All that extra air holds a lot of weight. On the larger tires, I'm usually around 30psi on the street for nice even wear. I miss D-rated tires for their lighter weight and the resulting acceleration, handling and mpg benefits...
I'm running on 285/70R/17E 121/118. They ride a little harsher than my Nitto Trail Grapplers that I ran for 8 years. They were suffering from dry rot, so I got these, since I got 100K out of my Toyos on an 88 Yota single cab 4x4. These are like 74 lbs. apiece......monsters for 33s. Let's fool around and air down to 30 as a start, and see what happens.........besides losing gas mileage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SpeedRye

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,853 Posts
265/75R-16 KO2s running 45 PSI cold on road, 15 PSI off. 45 PSI is unbearable offroad, but 15-18 PSI is pretty plush. 45 PSI is firm but quite comfortable on the road, but that may be because my daily drivers for the last 40 years have all been 4WD, so I'm used to a slightly firm ride.

I was concerned about center-of-tread wear at 45 PSI pressure with a (relatively) light vehicle, but with ~55K miles on a set of 5, rotated regularly, they are only a little over 50% worn, with almost perfectly even wear across the width of the tread.

Although the chalk test may be useful for determining the inflation pressure for street 'performance' tires with soft, conformable carcases, I'm not sure that it provides useful information for the stiff, D and E range AT tires that most FJ owners who actually take their vehicles off-road are running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Although the chalk test may be useful for determining the inflation pressure for street 'performance' tires with soft, conformable carcases, I'm not sure that it provides useful information for the stiff, D and E range AT tires that most FJ owners who actually take their vehicles off-road are running.
I think it’s very helpful if you’re not sure how much tread is contacting the pavement or if you’ve added a bunch of weight like a winch or bumper and want to re-evaluate your ideal pressure. In my case, after adding a winch and related bumper hardware, I had to add some pressure to my tires, the chalk test told me exactly how much without over inflating. Not sure how else I could have dialed that in. And not surprisingly, I need less pressure in the rear than the front. 42 vs 36 works best for my setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,853 Posts
I'l not so sure that the chalk test (performed at 1/2 MPH) really tells you anything about the tire contact patch going dead straight at 60 MPH, or when in a turn. There are lots of additional factors that come into play when the tire is rotating at 100's of RPM that are not present at 1/2 MPH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
I'l not so sure that the chalk test (performed at 1/2 MPH) really tells you anything about the tire contact patch going dead straight at 60 MPH, or when in a turn. There are lots of additional factors that come into play when the tire is rotating at 100's of RPM that are not present at 1/2 MPH.
True, but it’s the best method I know of to get your tires in the right ball park. It’s not like the pressures you end up with are wildly off what common sense would suggest anyway, but it does give you abetter idea of your weight distribution. What else can you do thats better?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,853 Posts
What else can you do? Simply drive in as many different conditions as you can with varied tire pressures, which is another reason why an on-board air system is so useful.

Another factor for me is fuel economy, as I was able to see a measurable improvement in fuel consumption by going from 36 PSI to 46 PSI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
What else can you do? Simply drive in as many different conditions as you can with varied tire pressures, which is another reason why an on-board air system is so useful.
Sure, but the chalk test will help you get to the ideal pressure faster. Of course, you will get better mileage the more pressure you run, but your contact patch gets smaller, affecting traction and tire wear will increase... so it’s more about finding the ideal balance. The beauty of the chalk test is it will get you in the right ballpark to balance all of that… at least at low speed… you end up with the highest pressure that’s not going to compromise on traction or wear for your particular tires and weight distribution.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top