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I am working on my 30K service and cant get the fill plug to budge. I am using a 24mm socket head and it seems just a bit loose and I dont want to strip the head, any suggestions. I have not even tried to bidge the drain plug for obvious reasons.
 

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How are you "addressing" the socket. Often a sharp impact will do more to loosen something up. Try a long power handle on the socket and rap it with a mallet a few times. I'm thinking about buying one of the old school "impact/hammer/ratchets" that you smacked on the end with a hammer. They worked great on bikes in the old days. Ron

I am working on my 30K service and cant get the fill plug to budge. I am using a 24mm socket head and it seems just a bit loose and I dont want to strip the head, any suggestions. I have not even tried to bidge the drain plug for obvious reasons.
 

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I am working on my 30K service and cant get the fill plug to budge. I am using a 24mm socket head and it seems just a bit loose and I dont want to strip the head, any suggestions. I have not even tried to bidge the drain plug for obvious reasons.
That's why I always tell folks to try the fill plug first, you did the right thing

Go through your toolbox and find a non-metric size, IIRC 15/16. Try whatever has a tighter fit. Personally, I use the non-metric 6-point size on my FJ, it fits the bolt head much better

If you can get a helper, even a kid, have them tightly hold the socket against the bolt head while you apply force
 

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Yes.. Downward pressure and 6-point sockets are a must. The 12-point sockets will get you in trouble.. Good point.. Ron

That's why I always tell folks to try the fill plug first, you did the right thing

Go through your toolbox and find a non-metric size, IIRC 15/16. Try whatever has a tighter fit. Personally, I use the non-metric 6-point size on my FJ, it fits the bolt head much better

If you can get a helper, even a kid, have them tightly hold the socket against the bolt head while you apply force
 

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Yes.. Downward pressure and 6-point sockets are a must. The 12-point sockets will get you in trouble.. Good point.. Ron

it's ironic that this is posted today, last night I tried to change the rear diff, and striped the bolt some.

I started with a 12 point, went and bought a 6 point, tried using a mallet... and now I have no idea what to do...:boohoo:
 

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what kind of gear oil and type are you using the transfer case? I have not changed mine and approaching 20,000 should I let it go until 30,000?
 

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Well, unless you plan on trading the thing off eventually.. It's got to come off. You might try a little localized heat or cold (i.e. expand the case a little or shrink the fill plug a little). I suppose that if worse came to worse you could drill it out, but that would be a real pita. Mine has only 3K on it and I'm yet to tackle the Toyota fluid changes. On the D44's on the Jeeps I had, they were just the opposite; you couldn't get them to seal (pipe thread). In some cases running them into the locker actuator. Possibly others here will have better advice. Ron

it's ironic that this is posted today, last night I tried to change the rear diff, and striped the bolt some.

I started with a 12 point, went and bought a 6 point, tried using a mallet... and now I have no idea what to do...:boohoo:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Done! Thanks for the help, I only have a deep 24mm socket and the closest to a 15/16 I had was a 13/16 so that was a no go. I was left with the good old crescent wrench, one good pop on a tight fit and it came loose.

The oil that came out looked almost new but it is now replaced with just over a quart of the purple stuff.

Thanks Again.
 

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it's ironic that this is posted today, last night I tried to change the rear diff, and striped the bolt some.

I started with a 12 point, went and bought a 6 point, tried using a mallet... and now I have no idea what to do...:boohoo:
Have you tried using the jack handle?
 

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another trick I've heard is to take your "sacraficial" socket and put it socket side down on a belt sander to take off the rounded lip on the socket edges. This takes some of the slop out and should allow the socket to fully seat over the drain/fill plug head.
 

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Yes.. I had forgotten about that. Good catch.. I've even driven a smaller (tiny bit) socket on and just thrown both the socket and bolt away afterwards.

I've also seen people weld stuff on problem plugs and bolts to get them out/off.

Either way.. One thing to remember is that if you have any damage at all to the plug/bolt, you should replace it later.. That is is/when you manage to get it out/off.. Ron

another trick I've heard is to take your "sacraficial" socket and put it socket side down on a belt sander to take off the rounded lip on the socket edges. This takes some of the slop out and should allow the socket to fully seat over the drain/fill plug head.
 

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Have you tried using the jack handle?
I thought about that, but it got to the point where I felt like I was doing more harm then good.

It's still in decent shape, but not enough to maintain a hold.

the thing that gets me is I'm the one that screwed it on.... I should be able to get it off!


maybe a wrench will work.. i don't know any ideas?
 

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Sometimes a wrench works better than a socket, if you can keep it very flat on the plug. Just curious; did you use a new gasket/washer and what did you torque it too? Ron

I thought about that, but it got to the point where I felt like I was doing more harm then good.

It's still in decent shape, but not enough to maintain a hold.

the thing that gets me is I'm the one that screwed it on.... I should be able to get it off!


maybe a wrench will work.. i don't know any ideas?
 

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I just bought some Freeze Off (CRC) at NAPA today, you could try hitting the bolt with that and while it's still cold lock a big vice grip on it and give the handle a good sharp rap. It should pop loose. Obviously, make sure you have a new bolt and gasket ready before you do that however.

DEWFPO
 

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Sometimes a wrench works better than a socket, if you can keep it very flat on the plug. Just curious; did you use a new gasket/washer and what did you torque it too? Ron

The bolt I could not get off (notice the past tense:rocker:) was the original. I had taken it off once before, and I am pretty sure I torqued it to the specs I think 26 or 36lbs??

When I went to the dealer to get new washers, I tried to pick up spare bolts, for front and rear and transfer, figuring I'd need em at some point. They only had one in stock.

so I took it up to the shop by my house and said please, and they got if off for me. Of course I went home, went to change the oil, only to find out the drain plug it torqued to tight to.... sob

I wonder if my torque wrench is junk (it's the one from tirerack) or what. I don't think I would have torqued these bolts this tight.
 

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I thought about that, but it got to the point where I felt like I was doing more harm then good.

It's still in decent shape, but not enough to maintain a hold.

the thing that gets me is I'm the one that screwed it on.... I should be able to get it off!


maybe a wrench will work.. i don't know any ideas?
I know you've already gotten it off, but in the future, the long handle (jack) will allow you to work on it with more control. No jerking, no hammering, and less chance of a slip. Worth a shot.
 

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Of course I went home, went to change the oil, only to find out the drain plug it torqued to tight
I usually go by feel with those sort of bolts. That is, once the bolt head/gasket makes contact with the machined face, I go "snug" and no more. I have snapped off small fasteners using a calibrated torque wrench, so there is a lot to be said for using the old-fashioned "tight but not too tight" philosophy

You have to be careful with aluminum or magnesium cases, if you strip out the threads then you need a heli-coil or other thread repair
 

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Man A Fre sells fill and drain plugs that use a 10mm allen socket. They are nearly flush with the housing and are unlikely to get damaged on the trail. I've used them for years and they work great. Just $2 or $3 each and should last a lifetime.
Bugs
 
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