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Discussion Starter #301 (Edited)
Here it is! Drilling without a press and vice is the worst! I had to put the non fouler in vise grips then step on it and drill with flip flops. Took forever as I had to gradually go up sizes one drill at a time. You can see how I butchered the non fouler in the process. You know when you're breaking out in a sweat drilling (not that kind of drilling) you are most likely doing it wrong.:)
But it's done and here are some tips.

If you buy a 7/8's o2 socket you will most likely need one of them flex head ratchets. I didn't have a flexy ratchet handy so I cannot confirm. There's no space in there for an au regulaire ratchet.
I also used an electrical contact cleaner spray cuz I could quite get the plugs apart. Who knows if it helped make a difference but I got er apart.
Best price for this socket after checking multiple places was Harbour Freight.

A 7/8's box end wrench will fit over the o2 electrical plug so you can run in down the wire and get all the traction you need. See pic below for a little trick you can do with two wrenches to break it free. I didn't need to do this, this time but I had another wrench hand so I could do this in case.

So far it's been a day and P0420 error code has yet to rear it's stupid face.
A week without it and I'm gonna move on to other issues.

If you have any questions about this hack you can post here or PM me. As always disclaimer is use at your own risk.

Price breakdown again - Total cost for non foulers was $8 to bypass this issue. I did the research and the cheapest I could find an O2 sensor is $47 for the downstream followed by $120 for the upstream and after all that it could still be the cat itself for a nice juicy $291! Total $459.00 U.S. or $616 Canadian funds.

Lastly GREAT NEWS! A friend of mine that I got back in touch with sold his Mini, is currently in a Hilux and is planning to buy a V8 4runner or a newer FJ. **** is coming roses for me lately LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter #302 (Edited)
Some thoughts about maintenance, specifically Engine Oil. IMO There is no reason anyone should be running any of their vehicles on regular engine oil.

This is why. There is always a sale on synthetic somewhere and all you have to do is do an occasional online search on an parts store web site. Just about any synthetic oil is gonna be better than regular but, of course try to stick with the better brands. Even the name brands go on significant sales... and sometimes to where it is the same price and even cheaper than regular oil.

Just make sure you have 2 large jugs of synthetic oil in your garage at all times and when you don't keep an eye out for sales. If anyone has a better method please chime in. Still learning as I go. And always keep a few drain plug washers handy.

Oh yeah, I also put in a little bit of ATP 205 every oil change as a preventative for my rubber gaskets.
 

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Discussion Starter #303 (Edited)
Feedback and Help please

UPDATE: The O2 sensor hack has been solid. Great $6-$15 solution to an otherwise huge cost.

BUT unfortunately the next thing I worked on may cost me large.
The Oil sensor that sits next to the Engine Oil Filter was leaking so I did a bit of research and saw that we can throw in some thread sealant or thread tape to plug it up. I opted for some teflon tape. Bad choice it seems.

Unfortunately I cracked and stripped the housing or is it called the oil filter sub assembly? Can some thin tape along with heavy handedness cause this? See pic.

What are my options from here and is it pretty involved replacing it? I did a quick search but didn't come up with any part numbers unfortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter #305 (Edited)
can you remove it and have a machine shop weld up and re-tap the hole for you?
That's a great suggestion but nothing opened this weekend. I tried the wreckers as well to see if I could grab the oil bracket sub assembly part but no luck. Lesson learned. Go buy the deep socket which BTW is a 15/16's for the Oil pressure sensor instead of cheaping out trying to use vise grips. In retrospect I think the pressure from the vise grips clamping down then me using too much pressure may have been the contributors.

Don't be like me. LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter #307 (Edited)
FJ Cruiser Parking Drum Brake tips and tricks

This has to be one of the most challenging jobs I have done on the FJ and the difficulty is the sequence in which you add the parts to the wheel hub. Followed by the Shoe Hold Down spring which I spent 4-5 hrs on before my wife found the key searching the internet.

I did this b4 but I reused parts and because there was less tension it made the job easier. New springs make it near impossible without knowing a few little tricks.

A flashlight and having the printed diagram taped in my wheel well really helped.

To start-
Ensure you point your tires straight fwd. Chock the front wheels. Loosen the wheel lugnuts while the tires are on the ground. Leave the truck in Neutral and the parking brake off.
Jack the rear up and use 2 jack stands and leave the jack on the diff for safety. Remove the wheels.

You will have to remove the brake assembly to remove the rotor to get to the drum brake parts. For that you will need a 17mm socket.
The rotor may be stuck even though the parking brake is disengaged. Loosen the tension with the adjuster by screwdriver

To remove the rotor you will have to have your car chocked and the parking brake off and

After you have Brake-Kleened everything and laid out your new parts... the first thing to do is grab that small zap strap and compress the 2 cups and shoe hold down spring (the rear one.) After that put the pin in through the back of the wheel plate and position the shoe spring so it is secure – twist to semi secure it in that 90 degree positon

Note the orientation of the zap strap in the pic so the pin can fit through and be twisted the 90 degrees.
I snaked the zap strap out the adjuster access hole and held it in place hanging some vice grips before starting on the next part.

Next part to add is the Rear shoe. Start by attaching the brake cable and the address connecting the return shoe spring at the top. You will have to use a sturdy pair of pliers here. It helps to make room for the 2nd shoe spring by pushing the spring to the back with a screw driver.

Now that the top and bottom of the rear brake shoe is secure focus on the shoe hold down spring. I have been able to do this in 10 minutes and on another occasion it took 30 minutes. Use 2 long screwdrivers and also the zap strap (needle nose pliers) to help getting the pin into that slot.

Be patient with this. It is the most difficult part of the entire job. Need nose pliers holding the end of the zap strap along with a long thin screwdriver to guide makes it doable

Make sure you have that back cup washer secured in the hole on the brake shoe.

Prep the front shoe hold down spring with the zapstrap then the pin.

Next is the front brake shoe. But first place the Shoe strut and shoe string in it’s home on the rear brake shoe.
Put the shoe return spring on the front brake shoe first then you can anchor spring to the and the top of the brake shoe on an angle first then levering it into the secure position. I needed to hold that spring in place with a screwdriver. Did not need pliers for the spring doing it this way. Hope this part makes sense.

Time to finesse the front shoe hold down spring into position. This one is much easier. Remember to use rwo long thin screw drivers and a pair of need nose splierrs here.

I reused theadjuster because the slots in the old ones were much deeper and less prone to falling out when installing.
Just make sure you clean it well and regrease it.

Throw that tension spring in at the bottom. Very light hi temp grease on those metal on metal wear areas.
Get that tension correct after you put the rotor back on and you are finished.
 

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I had a friend who bought a van that a couple had been living in - got it for a song, but it was soooo ripe!

After going through pretty much what you have, they had another friend who has been reworking RV trailers. He told them he got a small bottle of ozone from AirGas and simply put a hose in one window, with rags stuffed in the rest of the opening. Then crack the valve so it leaks, and let the bottle empty overnight.

End-O-Problems with odoriferous unknowns. They did it and were pretty darn happy and impressed.

You might also look up "Ozone Generator" - they really do work....

I know you probably got most of it, but if it comes back to haunt you - ozone is amazing wrt odors!
 

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Discussion Starter #314 (Edited)
Went to engage 4wd and it's not coming on. Here are the deets. I put her in 4Hi but the light does not come on. I drive it around thinking it will engage... but still no change on the dash. Pull over put it in Park and try 2Hi then 4Hi again. Still no luck. I try 4Lo and it clearly works. Drove around for the day in 4Hi and the dash light never comes on. BUT it feels like I am in 4Hi as the back tires aren't spinning out in the snowy conditions.
Question 1. I think I am actually in 4Hi even though the dash lights do not come on. Is that possible? That the sensor for the front drive shaft is failed.
Question 2. When I put the shifter into the 4Hi position is there anyway that an actuator, or other mechanism fails so as not to engage the 4Hi gears? OR is it as simple as the gear position is in 4Hi so those gears have to be engaged.

Lastly, Question 3. Is it possible that a failing actuator got me into 4Hi and now is permanently stuck in 4Hi? Is there a safe foolproof way to tell that I am in 4Hi or 2Hi.
 

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Discussion Starter #315
We had our first snowfall a few months ago and when I went to put her in 4WD… Nothing happened.

After checking posts from other forum members and a reminder and tips from a friend I decided to tackle the job at hand. But the intention was just to root around and test the indicator switches with a multimeter.
Took a lot of finagling as it was in a tight nook.
TIP to disconnecting the switch inidcator is this. The tools.
The first of the plastic clips (the one that runs to the front diff) must be done with Needle nose pliers. It’s easy with that but impossible for 30 minutes without.
That clip is also secured onto a thin sleeve of sheet metal attached to the TCase by yet another clip, so it doesn’t flop around. This other clip can be pried with a small flat head screw driver and the connector will just slide off.

Now this is the part I skipped because I did not have the tool.
I was thinking I could use something like an o2 sensor socket for this but there is no room in there.
All indicators are that this cannot be done without dropping the TCase UNLESS you have a crowfoot wrench. Size being 27mm or 1 -1/16 which I did not have. Local stores wanted $35 for just the 27mm but ordering online, I would get a whole set for $45. Put the project on hold until I had the tool.

But then I thought – I did do all the tcase and diff fluids in the summer, prior to that the 4wd worked. And I do remember that maintenance being uneventful. Having some left over gear oil I thought I would top up the front diff- where the actuator sits. Opened the fill hole and a little trickle came out so it looked OK. But I thought I would throw some more in there and let it drain but this time not to a trickle.

Hit it with a nice amount of gear oil and when the over flow slowed down I sealed it up.
Thinking being, that the actuator shares the same oil but there wasn’t quite enough to get into that ADD cavity… perhaps?

Buttoned it up and took it for a drive and while there was a delay and a noticeable click the 4wd light came on and you could notice it was indeed on when performing a tight turn.

After a few days of driving with turning it off and back on occasionally the clicking is gone, the 4wd activation is immediate and the VSC light even comes on now. Which is how it was before.

I still cannot confirm that the 27mm crowfoot wrench would get the indicator off but thought I would share as this COULD save fellow FJ owners a significant amount of case.

Each Switch indicator is $150 in Canada – there are 3 of them. They don’t take returns on what they consider electronics so you better get your troubleshooting right.
The actuator itself is at least $250 probably more and requires lowering the front diff and some gasket work. So make sure you try switch indicator and topping up the gear oil first. LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter #316 (Edited)
Another project that I had to get around to was the driver and front passenger seatbelt not retracting.
Found a site that said there was a recall but when I checked with the dealership and Toyota Canada they told me NOPE! And the guy was pretty short and impatient with having to field my question.
Did some followup research and there was some feedback on taking the seat belt module apart and refurb the coil spring in there. I checked the price and sure enough the $355 (Canadian) plus tax(es) made it worth my while to give it a try.

Getting the panel off is really straight fwd if you have some plastic panel tools so as not to scratch the paint until you get to clip that holds the door handle on. As always you can’t really see into that tiny nook to get an idea of where to press to get the damn thing off.
See pic.for how the wire clip is slid on.

Got the seat belt retraction module off and started to try to take it apart which took a little more effort than expected but when I got all the many clips recessed at the same time the spring jumped out looking like a birdsnest. I couldn’t tell where the 2 anchor points should have been. LAME!

Played with the coil spring for a bit but couldn’t get it to sit properly. After 20 minutes… I decided to see if I could perhaps get the belt off to wash it. I have read that sometimes it’s the fabric of the belt that has lost it’s pliability and become stiff that can add to the issue. Except if you look at the pic that shows the allen bolts in the 4 corners. The panel that I have to take off? Has the very rare centerpin allen bolt. Tamperproof! ****!

Did some research and found that this part in the states is only $120 U.S. but because it is considered "hazardous" part, they do not ship this part outside of the states. ****! AND of course I can’t cross the border to pick up from a Washington State Toyota dealership because of COVID19.

Checked the local wreckers but I would be getting an old part that would be have similar wear and tear AND the cost was $190 Canadian used- plus shipping.

In the end I had to bite the bullet and spring for the part for $355 which arrives tomorrow. Installing the new part will be uneventful.

My recommendation is buy the part from the States (if Canadian) when the border restrictions are lifted and the attempt to refurb this part is a waste of time for a Youtube certified mechanic.
 

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