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Discussion Starter #1
Quick question.

I have been cruising around a bunch in H4 in my AT (just bought it a month or so ago). I have recently noticed when turning sharply and foot off the gas at slow speed it feels like the wheels aren't quite rotating properly. Sort of like you were trying to turn sharply on a locked differential. It feels a little lurchy I guess would be the best way to describe it. It doesn't feel the same if I accelerate. I am just wondering if this is normal or should it feel like the vehicle moves smoothly when in H4 while turning sharply (think cranking wheels all the way to the left or right to parallel park sort of idea).

Sorry total nub and its my first time owning a full time 4wd vehicle.
 

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Are you doing this on paved road? If you are, you're binding up and causing undue stress and you can cause damage from what I understand for the auto trans. Keep to dirt, ice or other loose traction areas when in 4H/L, particularly while turning.
 

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first of all, don't do this on dry pavement, which is why it feels lurchy. it's binding, it's grabbing for everything, and since there's no ice, wet, or mud, it's grabbing the cement and clinging.
 

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That's exactly what's supposed to happen when you do the wrong thing. I'm sure someone will chime in with the exact page reference in the owners manual.:cheers:

You didn't break anything.:cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ahhh k gotcha

Its been in H4 due to the snow / ice. Will be more situational with it than I am being at the moment.
 

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The -reason- it becomes "draggy" when turning in H4/L4 is there is no diff. between the front and rear axles. When traveling forward the front wheels travel farther than the rear. The difference must be made up by "skidding" either axle (this is shared between the two wheels on that axle). This skidding is made easier by applying power (to overcome the friction tire to ground). Of course as stated above this applies extra torque to the drive-train and shouldn't be done on dry pavement, as that increases greatly the torque required to skid a tire. I doubt you would actually -break- anything, but you will wear the drive-train much faster. If there are extenuating circumstances you can actually break a "half-shaft" (part of the axle that goes from the diff. to a wheel). An example of this is if you were to "jump" the vehicle and land hard while circumstances cause this binding. The extra friction between tire and pavement has been known to break an FJ40 front half-shaft - and that was actually on dirt!

I've always used 4H in all my 4X4s on slippery surfaces, since learning it was a "good thing" (tm) after swapping ends while gearing down for a stop on a main street in my FJ40 years ago (that scared a lot of drivers on the road who saw it happen - they wouldn't get more than two car lengths of me once we were all stopped at the light - funny!). Any short wheel base vehicle will swap ends much more easily than a "normal" wheel base vehicle and so is actually harder to drive (FJ40, Jeep CJ, etc).
 
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