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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The specifications for the FJ are 5W-30 - says so right on the cap for the crankcase. I was wondering what you all think about using 20W-50 oil in tropical countries. Out where I am the temperatures are in the 80's and almost never drop below 60, even at night. Everyone uses 20W50, even in Landcruiser Prados and 4Runners.

Now I made my mechanic scour Guatemala City for 5W30, which he finally found with great difficulty, but for the future I was wondering whether the higher grade oil would provide better protection in hot climates?
 

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I am going to reserve my opinions on this one. Jayman appears to be the foremost expert on oils around these parts. He will no doubt give you the data you need.

DEWFPO
 

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I am going to reserve my opinions on this one. Jayman appears to be the foremost expert on oils around these parts. He will no doubt give you the data you need.

DEWFPO
X2, but I wouldn't use 20W50 in this motor because of the small orifices in the VVT lifters. I would have the 5W30 shipped to me.
 

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Outside of North America and the EU, a 5W-30 is almost impossible to find. Indeed, a 5W-20 *is* impossible to find. In the Rest Of The World, folks use a viscosity appropriate for ambient conditions

Toyota has many different viscosity recommendations outside of North America. For example, in South Africa, Their VVT motors are run on either 20W-50 or 15W-40

In Guatamala, I have no doubt you will only be able to find 20W-50 or 15W-40. The 15W-40 will work fine in those temps, the heavy duty oils are very good.

This is a scan a Prius member in Spain took of the maintenance section of his owner manual. Although a 5W-30 is prefered, they actually list a wide range of viscosity, with appropriate lower limits. I've also attached a scan a Prius owner in Japan took of his owner manual. You'll note a 0W-20 is allowed and recommended, the Prius in North America does not
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Outside of North America and the EU, a 5W-30 is almost impossible to find. Indeed, a 5W-20 *is* impossible to find. In the Rest Of The World, folks use a viscosity appropriate for ambient conditions

Toyota has many different viscosity recommendations outside of North America. For example, in South Africa, Their VVT motors are run on either 20W-50 or 15W-40

In Guatamala, I have no doubt you will only be able to find 20W-50 or 15W-40. The 15W-40 will work fine in those temps, the heavy duty oils are very good.

This is a scan a Prius member in Spain took of the maintenance section of his owner manual. Although a 5W-30 is prefered, they actually list a wide range of viscosity, with appropriate lower limits. I've also attached a scan a Prius owner in Japan took of his owner manual. You'll note a 0W-20 is allowed and recommended, the Prius in North America does not
Thanks for the info! I paid $62 for six liters of 5W-30 in Guatemala. Looks like 15W-40 should work for the FJ if I get into a bind. All in all I'm glad I've got the 5W-30 in there now since I'll probably be going through the Altiplano in Peru on this batch.
 

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20W-50 will do no harm, especially in warmer climes. Manufacturers specify 5W-20 because the thinner oil creates less resistance and therefore slightly higher EPA numbers. Manufacturers are using any and all methods to help them reach the EPA #'s required by regulation. I use 10W-30 Mobile 1.
 

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The US Postal Service uses 15W-40 fleet in everything they own all year long. But when the weather turns cold they've spun a lot of rod bearngs in their 4 cyl. trucks that call for 5W-30. They don't care because they have deep pockets...
 

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The US Postal Service uses 15W-40 fleet in everything they own all year long. But when the weather turns cold they've spun a lot of rod bearngs in their 4 cyl. trucks that call for 5W-30. They don't care because they have deep pockets...
Generally, most HD oil companies spec a lower limit of around -20 C for a 15W-40. For example, Esso XD-3 has a very handy low limit spec for the most common HD oils

http://imperialoil.ca/Canada-English/Files/Products_Lubes/IOCAENCVLESEsso_Xd-3_extra.pdf

The pdf I posted earlier, the scan from the Prius Spain owner manual, also has low limit suggestions for the heavier oils

One thing I have always found interesting is that Ford and Honda have specified a 5W-20 or 0W-20 for use in North America. That viscosity is simply impossible to find outside of North America.

The same motors are used in the Mid East, Africa, South America, Central America, EU, India, and Australia. It's now pretty easy to find a 5W-30 in the EU, but a 5W-40 or 0W-40 is still far more widely used there

In general, and I know I will get flamed for this statement, you will usually do less damage to an engine running too light a viscosity, than too heavy a viscosity.

With a viscosity too light, you will have some oil consumption, and perhaps long-term increased wear. Most modern motors are very tightly assembled, with modern machining methods, so that is less of a concern now.

Consistently high temps perhaps call for a heavier oil, especially one better formulated. A lot of the cheap polymeric additives found in bargain basement North American oils wouldn't hold up very well under hard use, especially in extreme hot temps
 

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Toyota's VVT-I engines work fine with heavy oils. As WESAYSO put it, it's all about meeting the fuel mileage requirements without having to change anything. In the summer, I have used Castrol 20w-50 dino oil in my Toyota's engines since 1983 (1983 PU, 1989 Camry, 1991 Previa, 1999 Sienna, 2001 Sequoia, 2005 Sienna, 2007 FJ) without any problems. My engine's valve trains have shown almost no wear during their lifetime and I find no sign of sludge under the valve cover. I am now happily using Mobile 1 10w-30 in the winter and 15w-50 in the summer. The FJ acts very happy with the 15w-50 all the time and it makes me feel very happy when I'm pushing the engine while climbing a steep hill. The radical environmentalists control the EPA and the manufactures are running scared. Just my opinion, based on 25 years experience. Take care and have a great day,
Bugs
 

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I agree with Wayne and Bugs. I run Castrol 20W50 in summer months, mainly due to the high Texas temps we get here in the summer time.

I change back to 5W30 in the late fall to early winter.
 

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The radical environmentalists control the EPA and the manufactures are running scared. Just my opinion, based on 25 years experience. Take care and have a great day,
Bugs
I don't know if I buy that or not. Mike Leavitt was head of the EPA for a while. He is as about as far away from a radical enviromentalist as you can get. My .002:cheers:
 

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Question for Jayman : Don't the 20W50 oils spec'd outside of the US carry different ratings than the one's typically available here in the US? (ex : ACEA A3 vs API SM)

DEWFPO
 

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You mean ACEA A3/B3,B4 specs? Those specs call for "severe duty, extended oil change intervals." For example, the standard oil change interval in the EU and most other countries, is 12 months or 16,000 km.

Extended oil changes can mean 24 months, up to 50,000 km. No way in hell our bargain basement North American oils could last a fraction of that

In older vehicles, I've had very good luck running heavy duty 15W-40 oils in summer, heavy duty 0W-30/0W-40 oils in winter. Most heavy duty oils are not appropriate for modern gasoline use, as the additives may reduce the lifespan of O2 sensors and catalytic converters

Most modern motors, I think a light xW-40 is entirely appropriate in hot weather. If you live in a hot country where xW-50 oils are common, and everybody else uses it, feel free to use it. Eg: many South American and Afrikan countries.

I'm currently running the made in Germany Castrol Syntec 0W-30, as its far easier to find than Mobil 1 0W-40. The Syntec 0W-30 meets the tough ACEA A3/B3, B4 specs, and should be good for all season use.

Unfortunately, everybody will have to wait until Sept/Oct before I sample the oil
 

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I would have been far more worried about what type of fuel was available, than the viscosity of the oil. In most South American, Central American, African, countries, the Mid East, India, etc, unleaded is hard to find

Even if the pump claims unleaded, you don't know if the more common leaded gas was mixed in, either by mistake or on purpose. Unleaded additives in other countries can be just as bad for O2 sensors and catalytic converters as leaded fuels

Eg: ferrocene, MMT, etc

Just curious, what brand and viscosity oil did your FJ run on while out of the country?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I would have been far more worried about what type of fuel was available, than the viscosity of the oil. In most South American, Central American, African, countries, the Mid East, India, etc, unleaded is hard to find

Even if the pump claims unleaded, you don't know if the more common leaded gas was mixed in, either by mistake or on purpose. Unleaded additives in other countries can be just as bad for O2 sensors and catalytic converters as leaded fuels

Eg: ferrocene, MMT, etc

Just curious, what brand and viscosity oil did your FJ run on while out of the country?
We were able to find unleaded fuel in all the countries we visited (Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Brazil, and Argentina). The law in Brazil mandates a minimum of 23% alcohol in the gas and after a while I started getting DTCs related to the evap system. Now that we are back I need to see whats up.

We were able to find 5w-30 most of the time; on one occasion we used 15w-40, and on another 20w-50.

So far I am not getting any complaints from any of the O2 sensors.
 

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Oh, that's right, vehicles in Brasil are required to run on much higher ethanol content. I sure hope nothing got damaged in the fuel system
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
When we got back stateside I finally got a chance to send a sample to Blackstone for analysis. The oil report looks fairly normal, especially given that I did not change the oil for 7,000 miles.

I tried to do several analysis before I left to establish a baseline, but the truck was too new and the samples were skewed with break-in products.
 

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