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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

I'm starting from scratch as far as prepping Hank, my FJ, to live in most nights for a 9 week road trip with my Great Dane. I am a camper/backpacker so I have the basic items (stoves, pots, utensils, etc.) but am looking for a list of things I need to buy/install that are musts (water, propane, batteries, heat/fans, etc.)

I'll take one off ideas or a full list. I'm going next August (paid work sabbatical) so I'm looking to get started to spread out the expenses.

Any help would be appreciated as it's just me and well, single girl problems!
 

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First, welcome from Oregon :smile

Where are you going to stay? Motel, camp trailer, tent, RTT (roof top tent).

I'd make sure all the scheduled maintenance on Hank has been performed.

What year FJ and how's it equipped?

Sounds like a vacation to remember.. :smile
 

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Discussion Starter #5
First, welcome from Oregon :smile

Where are you going to stay? Motel, camp trailer, tent, RTT (roof top tent).

I'd make sure all the scheduled maintenance on Hank has been performed.

What year FJ and how's it equipped?

Sounds like a vacation to remember.. :smile

Hi! I LOVE Oregon :)

I'm planning on staying in my FJ, most of the trip. An occasional tent night or hotel night now and again. So I'm looking for things I'll need to make my FJ equipped with everything I'll need. It's a 2014. Haven't made any alterations to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Welcome, sounds like an amazing trip! Some cash, CC, and AAA membership I would add to the list

Thanks! Those are definitely on the list. Any advice when it comes to things I'll need to make my FJ equipped with everything I'll need to live out of it (most nights)? Currently no alterations to it.
 

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How about a national part annual pass.
 

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Check the cargo area platform thread and the camping section. Someone recently made a list. https://www.fjcruiserforums.com/threads/camping-load-list.736248/


 

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I've travelled to many National Parks throughout the country since purchasing my teardrop trailer 4 years ago. I respectfully suggest that 9 weeks isn't enough time to visit 48 states and the NPs. You will be driving over 300 miles on most days. Besides there are so many places to see that are not NPs; i.e.

Arizona (Monument Valley, Lake Powell, Canyon de-Chelley, Tombstone);
Utah (Valley of the Gods, River Road UT-128, Escalante Stair Case, Natural Bridges, Moki Dugway);
Colorado (Phantom Canyon Road, Grand Mesa, Colorado NM, Tincup Pass - St. Elmo);
Montana (Battle of the Little Big Horn, Libby Area);
Wyoming (Wind River Canyon - Thermopolis, Ten Sleep Canyon, Fort Laramie, Dubois Area);
Nebraska (Highway NE-2, Sand Hills, Valentine Area);
Texas (Fredericksburg - WWII War in the Pacific Museum);
New Mexico (Lincoln - History of the Lincoln county war, Datil - site of the Very Large Array);
Oregon (Coast Highway, Three Sister Area);
Idaho (Thousand Springs, Riggins Area, US-12 between Lolo Pass and Kooskia);
California (General Patton Museum, Pacific Coast Highway – Monterey, Mendocino Area);
Nevada (Walker Lake, US-50 – Loneliest Road, Ely Railroad Museum);
Virginia (Eastern Shores, Multiple Civil War Battlefields);
Pennsylvania (Gettysburg, Allegheny River, Scranton Railroad Museum);
Kansas (Eisenhower Library);
Wisconsin (Mississippi River Drive and Locks); Ashland Area);
Michigan (Upper Peninsula, Mackinac Island);
As you can see I’ve just mentioned a few key places. Each state above has more and there are many states unmentioned.

If you enjoy geology, I recommend getting started on the Roadside Geology series, one book for each state. This is for novice to those that took a geology class in college. It covers highway segments, explaining features and the geology processes that form them. I suggest starting with Utah.

I assume you know about stopping in truck stops for showers and sleeping the night. I like truck stops more than Walmart parking lots, because the bathrooms are open 24 hours. Having a Love’s or Pilot loyalty card doesn’t hurt.

National Parks that are impossible to do justice in one day are: Yellowstone, Grand Canyon (both North and South Rims), Big Bend, Canyonlands, and Olympia.

If you plan to see Niagara Falls, be sure to have your passport, as the best views are from the Canadian side. Whatever slice of the pie you decide to tackle, have fun and be friendly to everyone, travelers / campers respond very well to smiles and respect.
 

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Hi all,

I'm starting from scratch as far as prepping Hank, my FJ, to live in most nights for a 9 week road trip with my Great Dane. I am a camper/backpacker so I have the basic items (stoves, pots, utensils, etc.) but am looking for a list of things I need to buy/install that are musts (water, propane, batteries, heat/fans, etc.)

I'll take one off ideas or a full list. I'm going next August (paid work sabbatical) so I'm looking to get started to spread out the expenses.

Any help would be appreciated as it's just me and well, single girl problems!
Remember, dogs are not allowed off the pavement in National Parks/Monuments. You'll need a list of doggie day care by all of the parks you intend to visit. In prime season, you'll have to reserve a spot for your Dane well in advance.

Drifta (in Australia) makes very nice relatively inexpensive drawer systems, kitchens, etc for FJs. Staying organized like that is very helpful. It would, however, decrease the headroom for your Dane. I travel with my Aussie, so that isn't an issue for me. But I don't go to NPs because of the dog regulations. If you like their stuff, you'll need to order by the end of Dec for a 1st quarter shipment.
 

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Remember, dogs are not allowed off the pavement in National Parks/Monuments. You'll need a list of doggie day care by all of the parks you intend to visit. In prime season, you'll have to reserve a spot for your Dane well in advance.

Drifta (in Australia) makes very nice relatively inexpensive drawer systems, kitchens, etc for FJs. Staying organized like that is very helpful. It would, however, decrease the headroom for your Dane. I travel with my Aussie, so that isn't an issue for me. But I don't go to NPs because of the dog regulations. If you like their stuff, you'll need to order by the end of Dec for a 1st quarter shipment.
It's just not correct about dogs not being allowed off the pavement in NPs. There are plenty of places to walk your dog. Generally, it must be on 6 foot leash, and there are a lot of places dogs are not allowed, like most trails or buildings. I don't recall ever hearing of such harsh restrictions. I've been to a lot of NPs, all over the country, usually with my dog(s).

That said, it's necessary to know what the rules are. Check out the specific Park's website or talk to a ranger at visitor center.

TT
 

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I've travelled to many National Parks throughout the country since purchasing my teardrop trailer 4 years ago. I respectfully suggest that 9 weeks isn't enough time to visit 48 states and the NPs. You will be driving over 300 miles on most days. Besides there are so many places to see that are not NPs; i.e.

Depends on how you cast your net, I suppose. We spent nine MONTHS doing that, and are going back to some to see what we missed. Last week we saw Grand Staircase Escalante, Arches, Canyonlands... none on our original list.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I've travelled to many National Parks throughout the country since purchasing my teardrop trailer 4 years ago. I respectfully suggest that 9 weeks isn't enough time to visit 48 states and the NPs. You will be driving over 300 miles on most days. Besides there are so many places to see that are not NPs; i.e.

Arizona (Monument Valley, Lake Powell, Canyon de-Chelley, Tombstone);
Utah (Valley of the Gods, River Road UT-128, Escalante Stair Case, Natural Bridges, Moki Dugway);
Colorado (Phantom Canyon Road, Grand Mesa, Colorado NM, Tincup Pass - St. Elmo);
Montana (Battle of the Little Big Horn, Libby Area);
Wyoming (Wind River Canyon - Thermopolis, Ten Sleep Canyon, Fort Laramie, Dubois Area);
Nebraska (Highway NE-2, Sand Hills, Valentine Area);
Texas (Fredericksburg - WWII War in the Pacific Museum);
New Mexico (Lincoln - History of the Lincoln county war, Datil - site of the Very Large Array);
Oregon (Coast Highway, Three Sister Area);
Idaho (Thousand Springs, Riggins Area, US-12 between Lolo Pass and Kooskia);
California (General Patton Museum, Pacific Coast Highway – Monterey, Mendocino Area);
Nevada (Walker Lake, US-50 – Loneliest Road, Ely Railroad Museum);
Virginia (Eastern Shores, Multiple Civil War Battlefields);
Pennsylvania (Gettysburg, Allegheny River, Scranton Railroad Museum);
Kansas (Eisenhower Library);
Wisconsin (Mississippi River Drive and Locks); Ashland Area);
Michigan (Upper Peninsula, Mackinac Island);
As you can see I’ve just mentioned a few key places. Each state above has more and there are many states unmentioned.

If you enjoy geology, I recommend getting started on the Roadside Geology series, one book for each state. This is for novice to those that took a geology class in college. It covers highway segments, explaining features and the geology processes that form them. I suggest starting with Utah.

I assume you know about stopping in truck stops for showers and sleeping the night. I like truck stops more than Walmart parking lots, because the bathrooms are open 24 hours. Having a Love’s or Pilot loyalty card doesn’t hurt.

National Parks that are impossible to do justice in one day are: Yellowstone, Grand Canyon (both North and South Rims), Big Bend, Canyonlands, and Olympia.

If you plan to see Niagara Falls, be sure to have your passport, as the best views are from the Canadian side. Whatever slice of the pie you decide to tackle, have fun and be friendly to everyone, travelers / campers respond very well to smiles and respect.

Hi,

Thanks for your reply. I've visited at least 20 of the parks already which will cut my trip down quite a bit (I don't need to go to Maine or Washington or Oregon). If it takes more than 9weeks, that's fine. I work remotely, so I can finish it regardless. I travel a lot for work as well, so I've (luckily) gotten to see a lot of places like Niagara Falls as an extension of those trips :)

Thanks for the other locations to see along the way! Much appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Since you are a camper/backpacker, you should already have everything you need except possibly a rear platform to sleep in.

I spent 3mos this summer on a cross country trip (some work too) and didn't pack anything except hiking equipment, water, clothes, and my dog.

Thank you for the vote of confidence! Currently looking at the rear platforms to determine what's best for me!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It's just not correct about dogs not being allowed off the pavement in NPs. There are plenty of places to walk your dog. Generally, it must be on 6 foot leash, and there are a lot of places dogs are not allowed, like most trails or buildings. I don't recall ever hearing of such harsh restrictions. I've been to a lot of NPs, all over the country, usually with my dog(s).

That said, it's necessary to know what the rules are. Check out the specific Park's website or talk to a ranger at visitor center.

TT

Thank you both. I am aware there are restrictions with him in the NPs but with friends throughout the country, I think we can make it work. And, I'll check out that company...much appreciated!
 
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