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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Moab Times did an article about the progress of the reconstruction of the White Rim trail at Mineral Bottom. Moab Times-Independent - With repair work u They are shooting for a mid to late Spring finish time, which might bode well for those that made reservations, but thought they might have to cancel them.



This is the story of what happened back in August to give you a background of what happened. Moab Times-Independent - Severe storm strands boaters drivers at Mineral Bottom damages other area roads trails
 

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that's great. That is one of the trails I would love to go on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
UPDATE!!

***Mineral Bottom will be open and accessible to private and commercial users on March 29th. *****

This is way ahead of schedule....WAHOO!!!! Great work by construction company!! Now if only Mother Nature will be kind to the area this Spring and later this Summer for the monsoon season.

Double check with the ranger station about permits.


http://www.moabtimes.com/view/full_...d-to-reopen-March-29?instance=home_news_right


Repaired Mineral Bottom Road to reopen March 29
by Lisa J. Church

"Work has progressed more quickly than expected and Mineral Bottom Road, a route that provides recreational access to the Green River and the White Rim Trail, will reopen March 29, officials with Grand County and several federal agencies announced this week.

Several switchback sections of the road were completely washed out by heavy rains on Aug. 19, and the road has been closed since that time. The closure cost Grand County about $4.9 million in revenue from tourism, according to a study conducted last fall by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. County and BLM officials had estimated that repair work would take at least until May or June, and that construction might not be completed until fall of 2011.

“This is just one of those rare projects where everything all came together and it worked out better than we expected,” said Grand County Council Administrator Melinda Brimhall. “We are very excited that the road will be reopened earlier than we expected.”

Funding for the repair work came from a grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Central Federal Lands Highway Division. That agency has worked in close partnership with Grand County, the BLM and the National Park Service to make sure the project was completed effectively and efficiently, Brimhall said.

Mineral Bottom Road is a dirt road that includes several narrow switchbacks. The road serves as a launch and take-out point for river trips on the Green River as well as serving as the access route on the west side to the White Rim Trail in Canyonlands National Park. The road is owned and maintained by Grand County at a cost of about $5,000 annually, county officials have said.

The BLM originally estimated the cost of the repairs at $1.95 million, but Moab-based KSUE Corp., the contractor hired to do the work, will complete the construction for about half that amount – about $990,000, Brimhall said.

“It was just really hard initially to try to get a realistic grasp on the actual scope of the work,” Brimhall said. “[KSUE] was able to save money in several ways. For instance, we thought we were going to have to truck fill material to the area, and that would have been very expensive. They were able to generate most of the [fill] material at the site.”

While the Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads program administered by the Central Federal Lands Highway Division typically allows only the replacement and repair of a road to its condition before the damage occurred, Brimhall said the Mineral Bottom Road was widened in some areas, out of necessity, and some concrete will be used in specific areas to help prevent damage from future flooding.

“The grade ultimately will be about the same, but it will be a safer road in terms of driving and passing [other vehicles],” she said."


....open way ahead of schedule and way under budget!!
 

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That IS excellent. :clap:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes it is true....it's no April fools joke.....local, state, and federal government agencies worked together and were able to accomplish something....and get this......it was UNDER BUDGET!!!!!....by almost half!! :rocker::clap:

Look at the beauty of their work....:bigthumb::)



Moab Times-Independent - With construction complete Mineral Bottom Road is reopened to vehicle traffic

"After three months of construction, the Mineral Bottom Road, Grand County Route 129, officially reopened Tuesday, March 29. The road, closed since a portion of the switchback section was washed out with heavy rains on August 19, provides access to the Green River and White Rim Trail.

Federal and local officials originally believed that the project would not be completed until late spring, reopening in June or July, however, according to Andrew Coit, the project engineer for U.S. Department of Transportation’s Central Federal Lands Highway Division (CFLHD), construction crews were able to use alternative construction methods, which aided in the project being delivered ahead of schedule. Coit also acknowledged that the aggressive repair strategy, cooperative partners, and the experienced and knowledgeable contractor enabled the project to be completed for about $900,000, about half the $1.95 million originally budgeted for the work.

“Construction crews were able to quickly mobilize and commence construction activities using these alternative methods, and Bureau of Land Management, Grand County, and Canyonlands National Park were all active in getting the project started and headed in the right direction,” said Coit. “The support and input throughout the process of those partners were very efficient and effective.”

Russ von Koch, recreation division chief for the Buruea of Land Management in Moab, said that the project owes a lot of its success to the Utah governor’s office and Congressman Jim Matheson, who were “very supportive” of the project.

“This is just another great example of local, state, and federal government branches working together to come up with a solution and cooperatively work toward making it happen,” said von Koch. “It’s just amazing what everyone was able to accomplish.”

Coit said KSUE Construction, Inc., a local contractor that won the bid for the work, worked efficiently and quickly to help save money and time. He said KSUE’s ability to respond, communicate, manage, and perform the work proved to be instrumental in delivering a quality product in a short time and within budget.

Von Koch also agreed that KSUE’s efforts to work with the design team during the process helped expedite the project.

“The key result of this cooperative work environment is the savings to the county because of the early opening,” he said. Last fall, a BLM study showed that the county stood to lose $5 million in revenue from tourism should the road remain closed until June or July.

Coit said he has been employed by CFLHD for two years, but this is his first time working on a project for the agency’s Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO) program. ERFO funding is intended to pay for “replace in-kind” repairs. The reconstruction and repairs to Mineral Bottom Road repaired the washed-out section of the road to pre-disaster conditions, with a few exceptions, according to Coit.

KSUE was able to generate most of the fill dirt needed for the construction on site by blasting into the hillside. Some aggregate was brought in for roadway surfacing, clay was used for the core of the detention dam above the switchbacks, and concrete was poured to provide rigid pavement sections in areas where water could cause the most damage, von Koch said. Coit said there was also a focus to integrate several redundancies in detouring drainage water away from the switchbacks to ensure future storm events do not cause such significant damage and, hopefully, save the county money in extra maintenance costs.

“It has been a great experience and I am proud to be part of this delivery team,” said Coit."
 
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