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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wouldn't this feature be highly useful if more aftermarket Fj bumpers offer this feature for use with the Hi Lift? Does any of them have this feature?

This is a receptacles that accept the Hi-Lift Jack's lifting tongue.
 

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The ARB bumper still needs one of those Hi lift adapters to work.:bandit:
 

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The ARB bumper still needs one of those Hi lift adapters to work.:bandit:
That is incorrect. The ARB, front and rear, have two reinforced jacking points that don't require anything.
 

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That is incorrect. The ARB, front and rear, have two reinforced jacking points that don't require anything.
For reals, i use it all the time. I place a piece of rubber (cut up bicycle tire) to prevent metal to metal contact. There is a slot on each side of the winch opening.
 

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Problem I see with that hi-lift slot is if you were wanting to jack up your rig to tip it off the jack, off a high center or deep rut, the tongue of the jack would get caught in that slot and cause possible damage to the bumper or jack.
 

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Problem I see with that hi-lift slot is if you were wanting to jack up your rig to tip it off the jack, off a high center or deep rut, the tongue of the jack would get caught in that slot and cause possible damage to the bumper or jack.
While that is an issue, i know that it is there to prevent that from happening. To aid in preventing the jack from wanting to tip to the left or right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Seem like a very simple thing. Well of course it has to be reinforced to be able to take the weight of the vehicle.
But would be a big swaying point for me also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·




 

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Why not just use a Hi-Lift Bumper Lift (BL-250)?

The The Hi-Lift Bumper Lift is designed to fit most steel curved bumpers, for quick and easy lifting. The Bumper Lift has a 3,000lb (1361 kg) capacity.

When used with the Hi-Lift Jack — which is not itself designed to be used on curved bumpers — the Bumper Lift makes raising one wheel of most average sized vehicles up to 2" (5 cm) above the ground an easy task.


YouTube - Hi-Lift Bumper-Lift
 

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Problem I see with that hi-lift slot is if you were wanting to jack up your rig to tip it off the jack, off a high center or deep rut, the tongue of the jack would get caught in that slot and cause possible damage to the bumper or jack.
Definitely seems that there would be a trade-off between safety/stability and flexibility in use of this lift point. I like it though - certainly doesn't have to be the only point you can lift from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think it's a cool concept, possibly one less item (bumper lift) to carry in the rig.
Also the combo of this option and sliders adapter (Wabfour) + sliders, all you bases are covered with out the need for any more items (like HL wheel adapter, HL bumper lift..etc).
 

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You can also use any D-ring mount and shackle (or hitch shackle) as a lifting point. Just make sure to "chock and block" the wheels whenever using your Hi-lift jack. ;)
 

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You can also use any D-ring mount and shackle (or hitch shackle) as a lifting point. Just make sure to "chock and block" the wheels whenever using your Hi-lift jack. ;)
I see two issues with doing this.
1. Looking at the back of my FJ, the spare is in the way.

2. This is a very, very unstable thing to do. The hi-lift would then become a pivot point and very easily slide to the left or the right. If you are doing this to raise the rear tires up off the ground, you are going to have to lift the rear high due to the droop of the rear axle. You are better off using a tire adapter or using the rock rails (or better yet have a steel bumper).

If someone has done this multiple times on the trail and find it to be a safe and effective lifting point, please correct me.:cheers:
 

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There's an old trick for getting off a high center where you jack up the rear end on the Hi-Lift and then you just drive away. It's a little nuts, and it can potentially leave some nice divots in the tailgate of a truck, but if it's a total beater - who cares?

This technique is effective, but in no way safe.

I've done this with an FJ Cruiser with the rear door open and the Hi-Lift jammed in the guy's hitch receiver. !!!

If you don't want to take off the spare, and you don't want to jack with the door open, you can jack from one side or the other of the spare, just as long as the front wheels are blocked up well enough.

To do this, you need a metal bumper.

Jacking from under the edge of the sliders or bumpers is for getting unstuck. If you want to lift a tire so that you can change it, you should try not to use the Hi-Lift unless you're also kinda stuck. The better option is to use the bottle jack that came with the rig.

The front wheels should be lifted by jacking under the lower control arm.

The rear wheels should be lifted from under the axle housing, out near link and shock mounts.

The stock bottle jack is more than adequate for the job.
 

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If you want to lift a tire so that you can change it, you should try not to use the Hi-Lift unless you're also kinda stuck. The better option is to use the bottle jack that came with the rig.

The front wheels should be lifted by jacking under the lower control arm.
...

The stock bottle jack is more than adequate for the job.
Had a flat my last time out in New Mexico, and when a front tire is flat there is not enough room under the lower A-arm to get the bottle jack under it. If you put it in the little frame indention made to take it, it will not move long (tall) enough to change the wheel if you have larger than stock tires. My dearly departed tire was only a 285/70/17 and the bottle jack would not go high enough. So in that case you are left with either shimming the underneath of the bottle jack and using it in the frame point or using the Hi-lift. I guess you could use the Hi-lift just to get the bottle jack under the A-arm.
 

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Had a flat my last time out in New Mexico, and when a front tire is flat there is not enough room under the lower A-arm to get the bottle jack under it. If you put it in the little frame indention made to take it, it will not move long (tall) enough to change the wheel if you have larger than stock tires. My dearly departed tire was only a 285/70/17 and the bottle jack would not go high enough. So in that case you are left with either shimming the underneath of the bottle jack and using it in the frame point or using the Hi-lift. I guess you could use the Hi-lift just to get the bottle jack under the A-arm.
Most folks don't realize it, but the bottle jack extends it's ram, and then there's ANOTHER RAM INSIDE IT! It goes to triple height. I can lift my 35's off the ground, no problem.

The first time the jack extends to the end of the first ram-travel, it hits what feels like the "end" of it's ability to move. I think it may be painted shut. A good *OOMPH* and it'll keep going to the next stage.
 

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Most folks don't realize it, but the bottle jack extends it's ram, and then there's ANOTHER RAM INSIDE IT! It goes to triple height. I can lift my 35's off the ground, no problem.

The first time the jack extends to the end of the first ram-travel, it hits what feels like the "end" of it's ability to move. I think it may be painted shut. A good *OOMPH* and it'll keep going to the next stage.
Thanks for this info Doc, I had no idea!
 
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